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Anxiety? There’s an App for That

“Gamifying” stress therapy might make treatment a lot more fun.

Anxiety

Stress Increases Empathy in Women, Decreases It in Men

New research from Vienna finds a big gender gap in how we respond to stressful situations.

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Texting and the Stressed-Out Freshman

A survey of first-year university students finds a link between heavy texting and poor sleeping.

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The Social Life of Genes

Your DNA is not a blueprint. Day by day, week by week, your genes are in a conversation with your surroundings. Your neighbors, your family, your feelings of loneliness: They don’t just get under your skin, they get into the control rooms of your cells. Inside the new social science of genetics.

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Time Flying By? You’re Getting Old (and Stressed)

New research shows that time seems to move faster as we get older because we’re more stressed.

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Avoid Burnout: Make Your Cubicle Your Own

New research suggests there are mental health benefits from personalizing your workspace—particularly if you don’t have a private office.

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How to Stay Healthy Even if You Can’t Avoid Stress on the Job

One researcher, who recognized that avoiding stress at work was, for some, completely unrealistic, went looking for alternatives.

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Facing Adversity, Some Find Solace in Science

New research suggests that, for some secular people, a belief in science plays a similar psychological role as faith does for religious people.

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Marijuana Buffers Pain of Social Exclusion

New research suggests one reason for the popularity of pot may be that it helps people cope with the pain of loneliness.

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What Does It Take for Traumatized Kids to Thrive?

About a decade ago, Washington State embarked on an early social experiment to educate people about the impacts of stress on children. The results are starting to show.

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Placebo Effect Produces Higher Test Scores

A new study finds it’s possible to trick people into doing better on a general-knowledge exam.

(PHOTO: TRIFF/SHUTTERSTOCK)

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Quick Studies

When a Romance Is Threatened, People Rebound With God

And when they feel God might reject them, they buddy up to their partner.

How Can We Protect Open Ocean That Does Not Yet Exist?

As global warming melts ice and ushers in a wave of commercial activity in the Arctic, scientists are thinking about how to protect environments of the future.

What Kind of Beat Makes You Want to Groove?

The science behind the rhythms that get you on the dance floor.

Pollution’s Racial Divides

When it comes to the injustice of air pollution, the divide between blacks and whites is greater than the gap between the rich and the poor.

Hunger and Low Blood Sugar Can Spur Domestic Quarrels

In an experiment, scientists found a correlation between low blood glucose and higher levels of spousal frustration.

The Big One

One state—Pennsylvania—logs 52 percent of all sales, shipments, and receipts for the chocolate manufacturing industry. March/April 2014