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Genes Are Us

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Is Social Media Saving Science?

Online discussions and post-publication analyses are catching mistakes that sneak past editorial review.

Who Funded That?

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Who Funded That? The Names and Numbers Behind the Research in Our July/August 2014 Print Issue

This list includes studies cited in our pages that received funding from a source other than the researchers’ home institutions. Only principal or corresponding authors are listed.

Quick Studies

Screen Shot 2014-06-30 at 1.22.29 PM

‘House’ Fans Are Scared of the Wrong Diseases

People who watch medical dramas like Grey’s Anatomy and House are more likely than non-watchers to be fatalistic about cancer and to underestimate the importance of chronic illnesses.

In the Classroom

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Cracking the Code of the New Economy: You Don’t Need a STEM Degree to Work in a STEM Field

Don’t be afraid to stick with your liberal arts education. If history is any guide, it could be just as valuable as knowing how to write code.

Genes Are Us

statistics

Why Statistically Significant Studies Aren’t Necessarily Significant

Modern statistics have made it easier than ever for us to fool ourselves.

Hot in Here

glacier

Resistance to Climate Change Is Killing the Government’s Ability to Use Science

Legislative opposition to climate change isn’t just keeping us from having a proper conversation about the problem. It’s destroying our ability to act.

Mosaic

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Running for Science: Guinea Pig for a Day in a Biomechanics Lab

Hayley Birch takes marathon training to an extreme level.

Quick Studies

yacht

Science: Owning Yachts Much Better Than Merely Chartering Them

When it comes to luxury products, owning them makes you much more satisfied with your life than using them.

Genes Are Us

life-scientist

It’s a Great Time for the Life Sciences, but a Terrible Time to Be a Life Scientist

Despite numerous recent breakthroughs and discoveries, the extreme competition and lab-research feedback loop don’t bode well for the future of the field.

Burgh Diaspora

science-researcher

The STEM Talent Shortage Debate

Do today’s high school students prefer to take the AP Art History exam over AP Biology?

Genes Are Us

biology

It Doesn’t Matter That Not Everything Matters

Why scientists need to stop worrying about whether or not everything in biology serves a purpose.

A Conversation With

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How Do You Make a Living, Board-Game Rulebook Editor?

One compound word: Kickstarter.

Mosaic

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Science Is, Undeniably, Making the World a Better Place: A Conversation With Steven Pinker

Oliver Burkeman explores human nature, violence, feminism, and religion with one of the world’s most controversial cognitive scientists. Can he dent Steven Pinker’s optimism?

Quick Studies

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In Defense of Studying the Duck Penis

Duck penis expert Patricia Brennan offers a catalog of all the amazing things that would not exist without the pursuit of “oddball” biological research.

Genes Are Us

science-publishing

Scientific Publishing Is Killing Science

Here’s how to fix it.

Hmmm

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I Paid $21.67 for Someone to Photograph My Aura

It was cheaper than buying a pair of aura goggles—even without the shipping costs.

You Don't Know America

american-science

How Immigrants Make American Science Great

While the rest of the world is catching up, the United States is still the leader in quality science research—thanks to people from other countries.

ProPublica

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Real Talk About Abortion

As the long, angry fight over abortion roars on, Tracy Weitz, a researcher in California, has quietly worked to gather reliable facts about the procedure and the women who choose to have it.

Genes Are Us

darwin-illo

Darwin Day and the Science of Science Denial

Why Charles Darwin is the perfect figure for an international celebration of science.

Genes Are Us

academic-journals

Why I Don’t Care About Open Access to Research—and Why You Should

Open access to research papers doesn’t mean much to researchers, but the government hopes it’ll serve a greater good.

Our Best Friends

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Dolphins Are Dying and No One Knows Why

If an Unusual Mortality Event sounds like something out of a movie, it’s not. There’s one happening right now.

What Makes Us Politic

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As an Experiment, Let’s Put More Scientists in Congress

A new-ish political action committee wants to see professionals from science, technology, math, and engineering stop carping from the political sidelines and start running for elected office.

 

biomedical-research

Do the Government’s Biomedical Initiatives Ever Lead to Medical Progress?

Over time, sure, but in the immediate future, social science will play a bigger role in any large-scale improvements to human health.

 

bermuda-triangle

Another Name for the Bermuda Triangle: The Ocean

Ships disappear everywhere, not just in the western North Atlantic Ocean.

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We’re Not So Great at Rejecting Each Other

And it's probably something we should work on.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and the Brain

Neuroscientists find less—but potentially stronger—white matter in the brains of patients with CFS.

Incumbents, Pray for Rain

Come next Tuesday, rain could push voters toward safer, more predictable candidates.

Could Economics Benefit From Computer Science Thinking?

Computational complexity could offer new insight into old ideas in biology and, yes, even the dismal science.

Politicians Really Aren’t Better Decision Makers

Politicians took part in a classic choice experiment but failed to do better than the rest of us.

The Big One

One town, Champlain, New York, was the source of nearly half the scams targeting small businesses in the United States last year. November/December 2014

Copyright © 2014 by Pacific Standard and The Miller-McCune Center for Research, Media, and Public Policy. All Rights Reserved.