Menus Subscribe Search

Follow us


Memory

Recent posts

This Is Your Brain

human-brain-close-up

The Limitless Drug: What If It Were Possible to Learn Any New Skill as If We Were Children?

You’ve heard to start studying foreign languages (and music and reading and memorization skills and more) at a young age, when your brain is better prepared to retain that information. New research suggests a drug typically used to combat epilepsy and bipolar disorder could help us retain that skill even as we age.

Findings

senior-age-art

Making Art Boosts Seniors’ Psychological Resilience

German researchers report positive changes in the brains of recent retirees who learned how to create visual art.

Mosaic

brain-supercharge

Can You Supercharge Your Brain?

Applying mild electrical currents to your head could take away pain, help memory, and improve attention—and the U.S. military is very interested.

Health Care

body-on-laughter

This Is Your Body on Laughter

Several new studies exploring the effects of laughter are contributing to a fast-growing body of research that finds just how important it is to keeping us happy, healthy, and sane.

Quick Studies

notes

Want to Remember Your Notes? Write Them, Don’t Type Them

Dust off your pens and notebooks. A new study finds laptops make note-taking so easy it’s actually ineffective.

True Crime

austin-street-1

Revisiting Austin Street: The Death of Kitty Genovese, 50 Years Later

The public murder of a young woman near her home in Kew Gardens made the bystander effect a household term in 1964. Now, fifty years later, it can be used to illustrate another psychological phenomenon: the surprising fallibility of memory.

Quick Studies

Memory

Which Sensation Is Best for Memories?

In a battle of the senses, hearing loses.

Quick Studies

Medusa1

Are Ugly Faces More Memorable?

Sure, but you’re also more likely to think you remember a beauty you don’t even know.

 

crime-lineup

The Limits of Memory for Witnesses of Crime

Using so much brainpower to make quick decisions during a crime keeps us from creating lasting memories.

 

brain-on-math

Your Child’s Brain on Math

Why do some children benefit more from tutoring than others? And does one small education study have the ability to drastically change our behavior as parents?

 

(PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK)

The Audacity of Brainless Slime Mold

Dispatches from the weird world of unicellular biology, where essentially brainless critters do a fair job of helping us understand aspects of human behavior–such as how we use memory.

 

(PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK)

More Evidence Music Training Boosts Brainpower

A German study finds young children who took instrumental music lessons did better than their peers on verbal memory tests.

Features

Illustration: Sébastien Thibault

Speak, Memory

How the science of recall is finally helping us to learn other languages.

 

Drawing Helps Kids Recount Details of Sex Abuse

Research finds child sex-abuse victims discuss their experiences in greater detail after drawing a picture of the traumatic events.

 

An Unforgettable World Series? Only If Your Team Wins

New research suggests details of decisive games fade more quickly from the memories of the losing team’s fans.

 

Eyewitness IDs Can Be Made Better

It’s business as usual for many police agencies, even after bungled eyewitness procedures led to high-profile exonerations.

 

A Genuine Jolt to the Memory

Little bits of electricity have been shown to help people remember names, a finding that might have implications for restoring memories and making new ones.

 

Art and Alzheimer’s: Another Way of Remembering

How the life and death of the Chicago painter known as Hilgos helped bring art — and a better quality of life — to Alzheimer’s patients.

 

A Really Hard Test Really Helps Learning

Challenging tests and falling short may be hard on the ego, but they can do more than mere studying for eventually getting it right.

 

Bodily Fitness Bulks Up Brain, Too

 

 

More on the Making of Brainiac Mice

Time to stir up the nature-versus-nurture debate a bit.

 

Total Recall … Or At Least the Gist

Two Cornell psychologists found we have two separate systems for memories, which helps explain how we can “remember” things that never happened.

A weekly roundup of the best of Pacific Standard and PSmag.com, delivered straight to your inbox.

Follow us


Stop Trying to Be the ‘Next Silicon Valley’

American cities often try to mimic their more economically successful counterparts. A new study suggests that it's time to stop.

Don’t Text and Drive—Especially If You’re Old

A new study shows that texting while driving becomes even more dangerous with age.

Apparently You Can Bring Your Religion to Work

New research says offices that encourage talk of religion actually make for happier workplaces.

Canadian Kids Have a Serious Smoking Problem

Bootleg cigarette sales could be leading Canadian teens to more serious drugs, a recent study finds.

The Big One

One in two United States senators and two in five House members who left office between 1998 and 2004 became lobbyists. November/December 2014

Copyright © 2014 by Pacific Standard and The Miller-McCune Center for Research, Media, and Public Policy. All Rights Reserved.