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What Makes Us Politic

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How Recent Immigration Complicates Our Racial Justice Policies

As greater numbers of non-white immigrants enter the country, our racial justice policies are leaving behind longstanding racial minority populations.

 

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The Unique Needs of Veterans in the Legal System

Vet courts, like drug courts, treat the underlying factors for first-time offenders.

 

guatemala-trial

Ex-Guatemalan Commando Guilty of Concealing Role in Massacre

Jorge Vinicio Sosa Orantes, who obtained U.S. and Canadian citizenship, is the highest-ranking soldier convicted on charges related to the slaughter of 250 villagers during the country’s civil war.

 

guatemala-trial

In U.S. Trial of Massacre Suspect, a Rare Chance for Guatemalan Justice

A survivor of the 1982 Dos Erres massacre and former Guatemalan commandos who carried it out will testify against a former army lieutenant, a U.S. citizen who prosecutors say lied about his involvement.

 

family-dna

The Flaws of Familial DNA Matching

New research warns investigators of inaccurate results, and unfairness to minorities.

 

juvenile-detention

Boys in Custody and the Women Who Abuse Them

The nation’s system of juvenile justice has long been troubled. But recent studies have revealed a surprising new menace: female staffers at detention facilities sexually abusing the male youngsters in their care.

Features

death-penalty

The Death Penalty Is Experiencing Technical Difficulties

How legal wrangling over the chemicals used in lethal injection could shut down capital punishment.

 

(PHOTO: ILYA ANDRIYANOV/SHUTTERSTOCK)

Seeking Second Chances Without DNA

DNA testing has overturned many wrongful convictions but the vast majority of criminal cases have no DNA to test. And some of those inmates’ convictions are also flawed.

 

Book Seeks True Justice for Crime Victims

Susan Herman, author of “Parallel Justice for Victims of Crimes,” wonders what if society did not see its help for victims as mere compassion or charity, but a core societal obligation?

 

When the Wheels of Justice Grind Out … Coupons

Critics draw attention to massive class actions that compensate attorneys well but recompense the afflicted with little or nothing of value.

 

When Black and White Aren’t Black and White

Two psychologists show that our concepts of morality and sin are mentally associated with lightness and darkness, with potentially troubling implications for criminal justice.

 

Re-Mapping Forensic Science’s Future

A critical report from the National Academy of Sciences calls for national standards in forensics science, validation of new technology and crime lab ethics.

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Sufferers of Social Anxiety Disorder, Your Friends Like You

The first study of friends' perceptions suggest they know something's off with their pals but like them just the same.

Standing Up for My Group by Kicking Yours

Members of a minority ethnic group are less likely to express support for gay equality if they believe their own group suffers from discrimination.

How Old Brains Learn New Tricks

A new study shows that the neural plasticity needed for learning doesn't vanish as we age—it just moves.

Ethnic Diversity Deflates Market Bubbles

But it's not in the rainbow and sing-along way you'd hope for. We just don't trust outsiders' judgments.

Online Brain Exercises Are Probably Useless

Even under the guidance of a specialist trainer, computer-based brain exercises have only modest benefits, a new analysis shows.

The Big One

One company, Comcast, will control up to 40 percent of Internet service coverage in the U.S., and 19 of the top 20 cable markets, if a proposed merger with Time Warner Cable is approved by regulators. November/December 2014

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