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A Lesson in Democracy From Driving Down the ‘Arab Street’

Reconciling democracy and shari’a is certainly do-able, but the results may not enthrall the West.

riyadh

The Speech Obama Should Give about ‘Innocence of Muslims’

A professor of the politics and culture of the Middle East argues that the current violent furor linked to a blasphemous YouTube clip offers a unique chance to deliver a telling message about freedom of speech.

Happy(ish) World Veil Day

A Twist of Faiths: Claremont’s Mission to Desegregate Religion

The Claremont School of Theology, founded 126 years ago to create Methodist ministers, has plans to train rabbis and imams alongside its Christian preachers. The alliance, Claremont administrators say, will create the nation’s first Islamic seminary, awarding the country’s first graduate degrees in Muslim leadership. But the idea has agitated people inside and outside the institution.

Books from different religious traditions

The Fear of a Sharia Planet

While laws preventing Islamic legal codes from supplanting American jurisprudence are often thrown out, that isn’t stopping Sharia from becoming a wedge issue in the 2012 election.

A Spotlight on the 9/11 Anti-Muslim Backlash

Ten years after the attacks, a sociologist sizes up the social impacts of post-9/11 anti-Muslim prejudice in the United States.

Welcome to Shelbyville: Loving, Fearing Thy Neighbors

In the documentary film “Welcome to Shelbyville,” a small Tennessee town deals with an influx of residents from Somalia.

Why Are the World’s Muslims So Mad at America?

Perceived American influence and its failure to live up to its freedom-loving rhetoric pour into a gulf of discontent in the Muslim world.

Burqa Ban a Boundary to Multicultural Impulse?

France’s newly enacted law banning face coverings in public reinforces the idea we explored last year that waves of multiculturalism are receding for now.

Muslim-American Terrorism Down in 2010

While U.S. Rep. Peter King holds hearings on the threat of homegrown Islamic terrorism, those who actually look at the issue say the incidence is small and dropped last year.

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Quick Studies

What Kind of Beat Makes You Want to Groove?

The science behind the rhythms that get you on the dance floor.

Pollution’s Racial Divides

When it comes to the injustice of air pollution, the divide between blacks and whites is greater than the gap between the rich and the poor.

Hunger and Low Blood Sugar Can Spur Domestic Quarrels

In an experiment, scientists found a correlation between low blood glucose and higher levels of spousal frustration.

Your Brain Starts Faltering After You Reach Age … 24

Sorry to break it to you, TSwift. At least in terms of cognitive functioning while playing StarCraft 2, you're finished.

Cavemen Were Awesome Parents

Toy hand axes, rock bashing, and special burials indicate that Neanderthals were cooler parents than previously thought, according to a new theory.

The Big One

One state—Pennsylvania—logs 52 percent of all sales, shipments, and receipts for the chocolate manufacturing industry. March/April 2014