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Writing From the Woods: Surveying the Literature of Opting Out

As part of our week-long series on people who opt out of society, Eva Holland traces the American tradition of examining the outdoors with loving precision, from Henry David Thoreau to Annie Dillard.

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When Commercial Fishermen Get Together to Recite Poetry

Ever year, hundreds of commercial fishermen gather in Astoria, Oregon, to present their poems and talk about an industry in flux.

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LOST at Sea

While sharks, elephant seals, and Pacific bluefin tuna on the great predator highway don’t carry passports, or care about sovereignty, the humans in Washington should care about the languishing Law of the Sea treaty.

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Breeding Tropical Fish to Save Their Schools

For every tropical fish that becomes a pet, four are killed. Joan Holt wants to take the violence out of their world.

Can Farmed Fish Flourish on a Veggie Diet?

It’s a fish-eat-fish world out there, which is bad news for ailing fisheries providing feedstock for aquaculture. If only some key dinner-table species were vegetarians, smaller fish would be spared.

Quake Rescues Reserve, Shakes Baja Fishing Town

An earthquake has helped seal off a traditional fishing spot in Mexico, pleasing conservationists but hurting locals who depend on an annual fishing frenzy to sustain their economy.

Lowering Flags of Convenience for Fish Poachers

New international measures to end fish poaching on the high seas would enforce laws where the poacher calls, not where their ships are registered.

Something’s Fishy About That Red Snapper

Preventing seafood fraud won’t be easy, but a new law has potential to stop fish poaching and laundering, which involves mislabeling fish in restaurants.

Dam Busting: A Concrete Victory for Fish, Jobs

Dam busting has local economic benefits other than clearing the way for an endangered species or restoring a watershed.

Snakeheads: the Asian Fish That Terrified Arkansas

How a government team called Operation Mongoose tried to get rid of the invasive northern snakehead by poisoning 400 miles of Arkansas waterways.

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Quick Studies

What Kind of Beat Makes You Want to Groove?

The science behind the rhythms that get you on the dance floor.

Pollution’s Racial Divides

When it comes to the injustice of air pollution, the divide between blacks and whites is greater than the gap between the rich and the poor.

Hunger and Low Blood Sugar Can Spur Domestic Quarrels

In an experiment, scientists found a correlation between low blood glucose and higher levels of spousal frustration.

Your Brain Starts Faltering After You Reach Age … 24

Sorry to break it to you, TSwift. At least in terms of cognitive functioning while playing StarCraft 2, you're finished.

Cavemen Were Awesome Parents

Toy hand axes, rock bashing, and special burials indicate that Neanderthals were cooler parents than previously thought, according to a new theory.

The Big One

One state—Pennsylvania—logs 52 percent of all sales, shipments, and receipts for the chocolate manufacturing industry. March/April 2014