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Fairness

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wealth

The Benefits of Wealth Inequality (and Why We Should Not Fear It)

Whether they are creating jobs or cooperation, new research backs up a positive role for the well-off—up to a point.

 

rations

Can We Make a Rationed World a Rational World?

In his new book Stan Cox argues that rationing—whether for food, water, energy, or medical care—will be the only logical way to combine sustainability and fairness.

 

babies

Are We Born With a Sense of Fairness?

Does fairness come standard with every newborn, or is it something that we (hopefully) develop as we mature? Here’s a multimedia attempt to answer that question.

 

Unequal or Unfair: Which Is Worse?

 

Seeing Fairness Evolve

Our multimedia presentation on the evolution of fairness continues with an explanation of how those with more convince those with less that their culture remains fair.

 

Drying fish

The Evolution of Fairness

A multimedia investigation asks: Can examining how inequality began in a hunter-gatherer society teach us how to fairly share the costs and consequences of how we use diminishing natural resources?

 

Missing the Gain But Joining the Pain

Since the First World already mucked up the climate, animal nature dictates that developing economies are piqued at having to clean up.

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Stop Trying to Be the ‘Next Silicon Valley’

American cities often try to mimic their more economically successful counterparts. A new study suggests that it's time to stop.

Don’t Text and Drive—Especially If You’re Old

A new study shows that texting while driving becomes even more dangerous with age.

Apparently You Can Bring Your Religion to Work

New research says offices that encourage talk of religion actually make for happier workplaces.

Canadian Kids Have a Serious Smoking Problem

Bootleg cigarette sales could be leading Canadian teens to more serious drugs, a recent study finds.

The Big One

One in two United States senators and two in five House members who left office between 1998 and 2004 became lobbyists. November/December 2014

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