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Criminal Justice

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Radical Life Extension and Time-Slowing Drugs

These ideas for the future of prison sentencing are outrageous, but the current state of affairs is, too.

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The Unique Needs of Veterans in the Legal System

Vet courts, like drug courts, treat the underlying factors for first-time offenders.

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How Often Are Prosecutors Detaining the Innocent Until They Falsely Testify?

For years, prosecutors in New York have been using what are known as material witness orders to compel testimony from reluctant witnesses in criminal trials. But has the power to persuade led to coercion and tainted convictions?

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The Flaws of Familial DNA Matching

New research warns investigators of inaccurate results, and unfairness to minorities.

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The Death Penalty is Experiencing Technical Difficulties

How legal wrangling over the chemicals used in lethal injection could shut down capital punishment.

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Seeking Second Chances Without DNA

DNA testing has overturned many wrongful convictions but the vast majority of criminal cases have no DNA to test. And some of those inmates’ convictions are also flawed.

(PHOTO: ILYA ANDRIYANOV/SHUTTERSTOCK)

Litigating Lineups: Why the American Justice System Is Keeping a Close Eye on Witness Identification

The single biggest cause of wrongful convictions is mistaken eyewitness identification. Is there a better way to find the right perpetrator?

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A Porn Stash and a False Confession: How to Ruin Someone’s Life in the American Justice System

John Watkins’ stash of pornography made him a look like a prime suspect for a rape in police and prosecutors’ eyes. How they wrung a confession out of him and convinced a shaky witness to ID him offers textbook examples of how to achieve a wrongful conviction.

David Onek — Law Enforcement Facilitator

David Onek works to bring together stakeholders in the criminal justice system who often agree — usually without knowing they do.

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Quick Studies

When a Romance Is Threatened, People Rebound With God

And when they feel God might reject them, they buddy up to their partner.

How Can We Protect Open Ocean That Does Not Yet Exist?

As global warming melts ice and ushers in a wave of commercial activity in the Arctic, scientists are thinking about how to protect environments of the future.

What Kind of Beat Makes You Want to Groove?

The science behind the rhythms that get you on the dance floor.

Pollution’s Racial Divides

When it comes to the injustice of air pollution, the divide between blacks and whites is greater than the gap between the rich and the poor.

Hunger and Low Blood Sugar Can Spur Domestic Quarrels

In an experiment, scientists found a correlation between low blood glucose and higher levels of spousal frustration.

The Big One

One state—Pennsylvania—logs 52 percent of all sales, shipments, and receipts for the chocolate manufacturing industry. March/April 2014