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Paddlefish

Catch, Fillet, and Sell the Eggs of a Dinosaur: How to Save the Paddlefish

As beluga sturgeon populations dwindle, poachers have descended on the waters of Oklahoma, searching for the source of next-best caviar: the paddlefish. But conservation officials might have found a way to save the prehistoric-looking creatures from a steady decline—they’re selling the caviar themselves.

Go Outside

yellowstone-bison

What’s Wild? The Battle for Nature in the 21st Century

It’s conservationist against conservationist as those that care most about biodiversity and wilderness argue over the best way to manage and protect what little we have left.

 

gorongosa-vegetation

Seeking Peace Through Superior Flower Power

Restoring Africa’s peace could be helped by restoring its fabled—and endangered—fauna.

 

volunteer-tourism

The Problem With Volunteer Tourism

While it might seem like a way for people to spend money and do some good, is it really the best way to enact any meaningful change?

 

f-bulb

Is the U.S. Cowardly in Its Approach to Energy Efficiency?

There’s a raft of national benefits to being more energy efficient that don’t need to invoke climate or politics. So what’s the hold-up?

 

Liberal Homeowners Use Less Electricity

New research finds households headed by Democrats use less electricity than those headed by Republicans, apparently due to lower use of air conditioning.

 

Consider the Crawdad

What lessons can we learn from an enterprising decapod?

Features

Save the Trees, We’ll Save Your Life

Can medical care motivate Indonesian villagers to protect the rain forest?

 

LOST at Sea

LOST at Sea

While sharks, elephant seals, and Pacific bluefin tuna on the great predator highway don’t carry passports, or care about sovereignty, the humans in Washington should care about the languishing Law of the Sea treaty.

 

Who’s Saving Electricity in Your Neighborhood?

Software company Opower thinks it can get consumers to use less electricity by instigating some friendly neighborhood competition.

 

Conservation’s Earnest Message Could Use Levity

Lions, gorillas, and wolves, oh my! Two on-the-ground proponents of saving the tropics think a great way to both engage and enlighten the West is to deploy a dollop of satire.

 

Alligator River Refuge Rolls Back From Rising Sea

As coastlines are battered by rising seas, staff at North Carolina’s Alligator River Wildlife Refuge look for ways to make an orderly retreat.

 

Marketing the Mystery of the Giant Squid

We don’t really know if the giant squid is endangered, but this animal still could inspire protection of the world’s invertebrates.

 

Botanist Brings Trees to the Israeli Desert

Deep in the driest and hottest part of Israel, a California-born botanist is trying to remake the Negev Desert with productive trees that thrive on abuse.

 

The Making of the Ocean Health Index

In the first of a series of stories tracking their progress in real time, three scientists explain the genesis of a global effort to present the health of the world’s oceans with a single number.

 

Green Habits Stay Home on Vacation

People who are environmentally responsible in their everyday lives seem to cast aside their green habits when traveling for leisure, a study notes.

 

Oregonians Embrace Ethos of Reducing Consumption

Nonprofit finds that 88 percent of Oregonians surveyed agree that reducing consumption is a good thing.

 

Energy Conservation Through the Lens of Faith

An ecumenical effort to combine spirituality and sustainability adds solar panels and wind turbines to the pantheon of religious symbols.

 

Save the Birds — With Doppler Radar

Doppler radar helped save the Texas forests where millions of migrating birds rest each spring.

 

Could Tidal Flow Fix Your Airport?

While common sense says more water by an airport means more waterfowl for planes to hit, wetland conservationists point out that not all birds contest the skyways.

 

When Bird Watching Means Dog Watching

A volunteer program to protect nests for the tiny, threatened snowy plover on a popular surfing beach has proven a model, but the birds still can’t fly solo.

 

Can We Avoid Devouring the Planet?

Stanford geographer Holly Gibbs discusses the challenge of preserving natural areas while still feeding an increasingly hungry world.

 

Recovery of the Island Fox

Dr. Lotus Vermeer discusses the unique recovery program that has restored the health of the Island fox in California’s Channel Islands.

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My Politicians Are Better Looking Than Yours

Study finds we judge the cover by the book—or at least the party.

That Cigarette Would Make a Great Water Filter

Clean out the ashtray, add some aluminum oxide, and you've (almost) got yourself a low-cost way to remove arsenic from drinking water.

Love and Hate in Israel and Palestine

Psychologists find that parties to a conflict think they're motivated by love while their enemies are motivated by hate.

How to Water a Farm in Sandy Ground

Physicists investigate how to grow food more efficiently in fine-grained soil.

Unlocking Consciousness

A study of vegetative patients closes in on the nature of consciousness.

The Big One

One company, Amazon, controls 67 percent of the e-book market in the United States—down from 90 percent five years ago. September/October 2014 new-big-one-5

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