Menus Subscribe Search

Follow us


Book Reviews

Recent posts

Shelf Help

korean-cool

Shelf Help: New Book Reviews in 100 Words or Less

What you need to know about Bad Feminist, XL Love, and The Birth of Korean Cool.

Book Reviews

brainism-brain

Brainism: Understanding Our Recent Obsession With Stress and the Mind

What kind of worldview is lurking in all the chatter about neuroscience?

Book Reviews

The Casino Pier Star Jet roller coaster submerged in the sea on January 13, 2013 in Seaside Heights, NJ. (PHOTO: GLYNNIS JONES/SHUTTERSTOCK)

Guide to a Sizzling Planet

Not everyone is a pessimist when it comes to predicting the impact of climate change. Too bad the optimists aren’t nearly as convincing.

Book Reviews

redsciencebooks

Red Science, Blue Science

The conservative war on science is an old trope, but apparently liberals have opened up a second front.

 

Crowds in Shanghai, China (PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK)

False Clarity, Authentic Confusion

An American strategist’s broadside pales beside a stunning account of how ordinary Chinese grapple with the enigma of their own country.

 

Book Review: Helping, or Harming, in Haiti?

A new book analyzes the successes and failures of the Haitian earthquake relief effort and offers some lessons for future well-meaning humanitarian interventions.

 

Book Reviews: How the Wealth Gap Damages Democracy

Two new books explain the rise of economic inequality, and suggestthe rich are different than you or me: they have more political influence.

 

Bust of dictator Stalin

The Dictator’s Learning Curve: David and Goliath Tales for Our Times

William J. Dobson’s The Dictator’s Learning Curve is an invaluable look at how strongmen hold onto power, and continue to repress their people—but it’s also a primer for how to chuck those dictators out.

 

Book Review: Practical Ways to Become More Creative

In Innovation Generation, Roberta Ness presents a blueprint for scientists and others who are striving to be more creative.

 

College: What It Was, Is, and Should Be

Jim Sleeper, a lecturer in political science at Yale, reviews Andrew Delbanco’s book about what an undergraduate education should be.

 

The Restructuring of Capitalism in Our Time

Fred Block, a professor of sociology at the University of California, Davis, reviews William K. Tabb’s view of the 2008 financial crisis.

 

The Book of Mormon: A Biography

Wade Clark Roof, a professor of religion and society at the University of California, Santa Barbara, reviews Paul C. Gutjahr’s new book.

 

How Norman Borlaug Went With the Grain

“Our Daily Bread: The Essential Norman Borlaug” is a multivolume biography that chronicles the microbiologist and his Nobel Prize-winning work to thwart starvation.

 

Explaining Liberals to Conservatives, and Vice-Versa

Psychologist Jonathan Haidt can tell you why you feel so righteous about your politics, but will you listen?

 

Review: Seeing Haiti’s Distress as People, Not Statistics

The new book “A Promise in Haiti” focuses on three families and puts meat on the bones of a nation most of the world sees as just a carcass.

 

Why I Quit Primary Care: One Doctor’s Story

In the new book “Out of Practice,” a primary care physician tells why he quit his practice and why the care of 78 million aging baby boomers can’t be left to specialists.

 

Finding a New Gandhi in the Book ‘Great Soul’

Like other great figures, new writings about Mohandas Gandhi tell us something about the subject but perhaps more about our times.

 

‘The Fair Society’ — Author Calls for More Equality

Social critic Peter Corning argues for a new social structure based on equality, equity and reciprocity in his new book “The Fair Society.”

 

Invasion of the Unregulated Chemicals

Carl Cranor’s book “Legally Poisoned” says lax, outdated law puts Americans at risk from untested industrial chemicals.

 

How Did Students Become Academically Adrift?

“Academically Adrift,” a new book on the failures of higher education, finds that undergrads don’t study, and professors don’t make them.

 

Your Brain: A User’s Guide

New books “Self Comes to Mind” and “On Second Thought” examine the origins of consciousness, and the unconscious pulls that influence our behavior.

 

Book Seeks True Justice for Crime Victims

Susan Herman, author of “Parallel Justice for Victims of Crimes,” wonders what if society did not see its help for victims as mere compassion or charity, but a core societal obligation?

 

Throwing the Book at China

The author of “China in the 21st Century: What Everyone Needs to Know” examines the current crop of books aiming to open Western eyes to China in this “post-post-Cold War Era.”

 

Welfare Reform Failing Poor Single Mothers

“Stretched Thin,” “Both Hands Tied,” and “The War on Welfare” are three new books that highlight welfare reform’s failure to address the enduring poverty of single mothers and their children.

A weekly roundup of the best of Pacific Standard and PSmag.com, delivered straight to your inbox.

Follow us


On the Hunt for Fake Facebook Likes

A new study finds ways to uncover Facebook Like farms.

All-Girls Schools Don’t Make Girls More Competitive

Parents, not educational setting, may be the key.

For Charitable Products, Sex Doesn’t Sell

Sexy women may turn heads, but for pro-social and charitable products, they won't change minds.

Carbon Taxes Really Do Work

A new study shows that taxing carbon dioxide emissions could actually work to reduce greenhouse gases without any negative effects on employment and revenues.

Savor Good Times, Get Through the Bad Ones—With Categories

Ticking off a category of things to do can feel like progress or a fun time coming to an end.

The Big One

One in three tourists to Jamaica reports getting harassed; half of them are hassled to buy drugs. September/October 2014 new-big-one-4

Copyright © 2014 by Pacific Standard and The Miller-McCune Center for Research, Media, and Public Policy. All Rights Reserved.