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The First Americans

Until recently, the reigning theory on who the first Homo sapiens in North America were pointed to the Clovis people, evidence of whose culture was discovered in the American Southwest. That theory has been powerfully challenged by, among others, Meadowcroft, an archaeological dig in western Pennsylvania that began in the 1970s.

Quick Studies

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Cavemen Were Awesome Parents

Toy hand axes, rock bashing, and special burials indicate that Neanderthals were cooler parents than previously thought, according to a new theory.

 

habanero-pepper

A Hot Time in the Old Archaeological Dig Tonight

Ancient people of Mesoamerica apparently liked a hot drink in the morning, too. A spicy hot drink, that is.

 

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Tomb Raiders Foiled

Archaeologists working in Peru sat on the find of a lifetime for months, keeping the artifacts safe from thieves.

 

Two Paths to Inequality

Our multimedia presentation on the evolution of fairness continues with a discussion of two different theories accounting for the rise of inequality.

 

The Pit House

Our multimedia presentation on the evolution of fairness continues with a visit to the reconstructed houses that saw the rise of a ‘transegalitarian’ society.

 

Comet Theory Comes Crashing to Earth

An elegant archaeological hypothesis, under fire for results that can’t be replicated, may ultimately come undone.

 

Uncovering Ancient Brews, and Cures

Patrick McGovern’s alcohol-infused archaeology informs some of the best local alehouses, but the real benefit of his work may lie in the cancer ward.

 

Global Warming: the Archaeological Frontier

Melting glaciers yield evidence on new theories of Asian migration to the Americas. Underwater robots search the sea bottom, looking for more.

 

Learning from the Ancients

A leading archaeologist’s take on the pre-European Maya discounts ‘ecocide’ and suggests the people were actually astute stewards of the jungle who could teach us a thing or two.

 

Indiana Jones and the Temple of eBay

The digital revolution lets antiquities forgers sell their ‘replicas’ worldwide, unintentionally undermining the black market in looted artifacts.

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Attitudes About Race Affect Actions, Even When They Don’t

Tiny effects of attitudes on individuals' actions pile up quickly.

Geography, Race, and LOLs

The online lexicon spreads through racial and ethnic groups as much as it does through geography and other traditional linguistic measures.

Feeling—Not Being—Wealthy Cuts Support for Economic Redistribution

A new study suggests it's relative wealth that leads people to oppose taxing the rich and giving to the poor.

Sufferers of Social Anxiety Disorder, Your Friends Like You

The first study of friends' perceptions suggest they know something's off with their pals but like them just the same.

Standing Up for My Group by Kicking Yours

Members of a minority ethnic group are less likely to express support for gay equality if they believe their own group suffers from discrimination.

The Big One

One in two United States senators and two in five House members who left office between 1998 and 2004 became lobbyists. November/December 2014

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