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Eliminate the Electoral College

• December 22, 2008 • 6:08 PM

Miller-McCune’s experts offer solutions to problems that were under-discussed during the presidential campaign.

I was at a business dinner in Asia shortly after the 2000 election. Jokes were being made about still not knowing who will be the next U.S. president: “Isn’t it typical of Americans to bring in the lawyers?” And so on. I defended the U.S. by noting there aren’t riots and burning cars, as in some Asian countries. One man responded, “The son of a former president wins office with disputed votes in a state run by his brother. What makes you any different than Indonesia?”

That gave me pause, and in the pause another said, “And the person with the most votes loses. How is that?” I tried to explain the Electoral College, to an increasing number of laughs.

I left Asia convinced I would return home to a strong movement to eliminate an antiquated and obviously dumb system. Eight years later, a vote in Wyoming is just about worthless compared to a vote in Florida. Some voters are courted, others ignored, according to their value in a math game. When told in school that every vote counts, we were being lied to.

Deal with the lie. Direct elections value each and every vote. Have the courage to eliminate a damaging and dangerous flaw in our system.

More Unsolicited Advice …


Re-establish Respect for the Constitutional Separation of Powers
Mickey Edwards, Princeton University:
Despite repeated assertions by both Barack Obama and John McCain that their policies would differ significantly from those of the previous administration, virtually no attention was paid during the campaign to the worst feature of the Bush presidency: the determined undermining of America’s constitutional framework. Read more


Restore Public Faith in Science
Sunshine Menezes, Ph.D., University of Rhode Island: Before the tumbling economy sucked the air out of other issues in the 2008 presidential campaign, there was laudable effort to bring attention to a largely overlooked but critical policy issue: the decline of American science funding and education. Read more


Close the Turkey Farm
Thomas A. Birkland, Ph.D., North Carolina State University: The president should remove FEMA from Homeland Security. Minimally, he could issue an executive order that indicates that the FEMA director reports directly to the president during disasters. Read more


Grant All Americans Their Day in Court
James L. Gibson, Ph.D. Washington University in St. Louis: One issue I believe your administration ought to address is that of access to justice by ordinary citizens. As you are no doubt aware by virtue of your legal training, the American legal system has been radically reshaped during the Republican years under so-called tort reform. Read more


Return Balance to the Federal Judiciary
Cornell W. Clayton, Ph.D., Washington State University: You will have the opportunity to nominate many federal judges and no doubt one or more individuals to the U.S. Supreme Court in the next four years. Please restore balance to our federal judiciary. By balance, I do not refer to partisanship or ideology but to life experience and public stature. Read more


P. People O.
Bill Savage, Ph.D., Northwestern University: Piss people off. Piss off the right-wing Cuban Americans in Florida by normalizing relations with Cuba. (If we can work with the commies in Vietnam or China, then we can work with the Cubans.) Piss off the agribusiness industry by ending subsidies for farms not owned and worked by individual families. Read more


Pay More Attention to Our Own Backyard
Douglas Massey, Ph.D., Princeton University: A clear lesson of the last eight years is that the world is now too large and complex to be dominated by a single power. Nations that try to exercise unilateral economic and military power will only undermine their moral and material position in the world and contribute to their own decline. Read more


Find a New Immigration Perspective
James La Valle, Ph.D., Murray State University: Conspicuously absent from both 2008 presidential campaigns was a fair, honest and decisive proposal to solve the immigration problem in the U.S., especially with respect to our southern border. Read more


Make Real Racial Progress
Phillip Atiba Goff, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles: There are few places where the United States is further away from achieving “post-raciality” than in our prisons and courtrooms. … It is distressing to think that this election’s celebration of moral progress could coincide with the largest incarceration of a people in the history of the world, with recent reports estimating that as many as 1 in 9 black males between the ages of 18 and 34 are held in penitentiaries. Read more

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Len Sellers
A former executive vice president for the leading Internet strategy and design firm Razorfish, Len Sellers is chairman and CEO of the venture catalyst firm Hammer2Anvil and a professor emeritus at San Francisco State University, where he has been on the faculty since 1975.

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