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Tracking Climate Change

• October 22, 2010 • 5:00 AM

A footprint comparison of total carbon dioxide emissions by nation and per capita shows there’s plenty of room for smaller countries to reduce their carbon footprints.

As the international community tries to come to grips with climate change, the difficulties of reaching agreement on the regulation of carbon dioxide emissions worldwide are becoming ever more apparent.

One sticking point involves the relative contribution of First and Third World countries to global warming. Developing nations have contended that industrialized countries caused climate change and ought to bear the brunt of CO2 regulation.

The West points at exponential growth in China and India as a reason that regulation of carbon emissions must apply across the board. For atmospheric carbon dioxide levels to stabilize, this chart clearly shows, the world’s major emitters — China, the U.S., India, Japan, Russia and the European Union, among others — will have to reduce their carbon footprints. At the same time, it’s clear there is plenty of room for other, smaller countries to reduce their per capita contributions to a problem that threatens all.

To enlarge and explore the carbon footprint comparison, simply click the graphic below and download the PDF.

Tracking Climate Change -- Carbon Footprint Graphic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stanford Kay
Stanford Kay is an award-winning information graphic designer and artist. Formerly on staff at Newsweek, his work has also appeared in Business Week, The New York Times and Good magazine. He now divides his time between his design office and his painting studio, both of which overlook the mighty Hudson River in Nyack, N.Y.

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