Menus Subscribe Search

Vibrating Mice Shake Up the Fight Against Diabetes

• October 24, 2012 • 12:01 PM

In a case of genuine good vibrations, a daily shake-up may help stave off diabetes in over-eating young people. It works in young mice, at any rate, and it works well, says Georgia Health Sciences University’s Dr. Jack C. Yu.

The shaking is a 20-minute session of whole-body vibration developed by the Soviet Union’s space program to prevent muscle and bone loss during long periods of weightlessness. Its reception since has been mixed: Biomechanical stimulation has since been linked to a number of positive effects, such as improved strength and reduced bone loss, even as studies have questioned those claims of improved strength and reduced bone loss. A quick Google search of the term “whole-body vibration” suggests a dab of skepticism might be warranted, with ads shilling machines offering to take the sweat out of fitness far outnumbering, say, analyses from the Mayo Clinic.

The researchers in Georgia were looking at a way to “leverage” the dawning realization that bones are endocrine organs, not to sell exercise gadgets. Dr. Yu, a craniofacial surgeon who heads the plastic and reconstructive surgery section at his university’s medical college,  suggests that the vibration mimics the motion bones get during exercise, and so the body responds as if muscles were busy beavering away. Among those responses to bending bones is the production of a bone-building protein that also tells the pancreas that a meal is likely inbound. The vibration-sponsored bone bending also produced a vast improvement in the mice’s ability to handle inflammation.

Researchers joining Yu found that eight weeks of daily sessions in the mouse-shaker did more to reduce one indicator of glucose levels in the blood than did prescription drugs. In fact, just four days of treatment saw the mice better handling a sugar-surge after a big meal (the mice were, by the way, genetically designed to overeat). Keep in mind that the inability to handle glucose levels properly is essentially shorthand for diabetes. Adding to the general feeling that the experiment might be onto something, diabetes symptoms, such as excessive thirst and diluted urine, were reduced in the lab animals.

The vibrations, however, only worked their magic on young mice—but that’s OK.

“This is our model: the average American teenager who eats too much,” said Yu in a release from Georgia Health Sciences University. The next step for the researchers is to try out whole-body vibration on human adolescents.

There shouldn’t be too much trouble finding human subjects. Besides the epidemic of teen obesity—more than 37 percent in Georgia, for example—creating lots of roly-poly kids, Yu reports his subjects seemed to enjoy being vibrated.

Michael Todd
Most of Michael Todd's career has been spent in newspaper journalism, ranging from papers in the Marshall Islands to tiny California farming communities. Before joining the publishing arm of the Miller-McCune Center, he was managing editor of the national magazine Hispanic Business.

More From Michael Todd

A weekly roundup of the best of Pacific Standard and PSmag.com, delivered straight to your inbox.

Recent Posts

July 31 • 11:17 AM

How California Could Power Itself Using Nothing but Renewables

We don’t need fossil fuels.


July 31 • 8:00 AM

Should Athletes Train Their Memories?

Sure, but it probably won’t help.


July 31 • 6:00 AM

Universal Basic Income: Something We Can All Agree on?

According to Almaz Zelleke, it’s not a crazy thought.


July 31 • 4:00 AM

Medical Dramas Produce Misinformed, Fatalistic Viewers

New research suggests TV doctor dramas leave viewers with skewed impressions of important health-related topics.


July 30 • 4:00 PM

Still the World’s Top Military Spender

Although declining in real terms, the United States’ military budget remains substantial and a huge drain on our public resources.



July 30 • 2:04 PM

The Rise of the Nuisance Flood

Minor floods are afflicting parts of Maryland nearly 10 times more often than was the case in the 1960s.


July 30 • 2:00 PM

The (Mostly Awful) Things You Learn After Investigating Unpaid Internships for a Year

Though the intern economy remains opaque, dialogue about the role of interns in the labor force—and protections they deserve—is beginning to take shape.


July 30 • 12:00 PM

Why Coffee Shortages Won’t Change the Price of Your Frappuccino

You’re so loyal to Starbucks—and the company knows it—that your daily serving of caffeine is already marked up beyond the reach of any fluctuations in supply.



July 30 • 10:00 AM

Having Difficult Conversations With Your Children

Why it’s necessary, and how to do it.


July 30 • 8:00 AM

How to Make a Convincing Sci-Fi Movie on a Tight Budget

Coherence is a good movie, and its initial shoot cost about the same amount of money as a used Prius.


July 30 • 6:00 AM

Are You Really as Happy as You Say You Are?

Researchers find a universal positivity bias in the way we talk, tweet, and write.


July 30 • 4:00 AM

The Declining Wage Gap for Gay Men

New research finds gay men in America are rapidly catching up with straight married men in terms of wages.


July 30 • 2:00 AM

LeBron James Migration: Big Chef Seeking Small Pond

The King’s return to Cleveland is a symbol for the dramatic shift in domestic as well as international migration.


July 29 • 4:00 PM

Are Children Seeking Refuge Turning More Americans Against Undocumented Immigrants?

A look at Pew Research Center survey data collected in February and July of this year.


July 29 • 2:00 PM

Under Water: The EPA’s Ongoing Struggle to Combat Pollution

Frustration and inaction color efforts to enforce the Clean Water Act.


July 29 • 12:40 PM

America’s Streams Are Awash With Pesticides Banned in Europe

You may have never heard of clothianidin, but it’s probably in your local river.


July 29 • 12:00 PM

Mining Your Genetic Data for Profit: The Dark Side of Biobanking

One woman’s personal story raises deep questions about the stark limits of current controls in a nascent industry at the very edge of the frontier of humans and technology.


July 29 • 11:23 AM

Where Should You Go to College?


July 29 • 10:29 AM

How Textbooks Have Changed the Face of War

War is more personal, less glorious, and more hellish in modern textbooks than in the past. But there’s still room for improvement.


July 29 • 10:00 AM

The Monolingual American: Why Are Those Outside of the U.S. Encouraging It?

If you are an American trying to learn German in a large German town or city, you will mostly hear English in return, even when you give sprechen your best shot.


July 29 • 8:00 AM

The Elusive Link Between Casinos and Crime

With a study of the impact of Philadelphia’s SugarHouse Casino, a heated debate gets fresh ammunition.


July 29 • 6:00 AM

What Are the Benefits of Locking Yourself in a Tank and Floating in Room-Temperature Saltwater?

After three sessions in an isolation tank, the answer’s still not quite clear.


July 29 • 4:00 AM

Harry Potter and the Battle Against Bigotry

Kids who identify with the hero of J.K. Rowling’s popular fantasy novels hold more open-minded attitudes toward immigrants and gays.


Follow us


Subscribe Now

The Rise of the Nuisance Flood

Minor floods are afflicting parts of Maryland nearly 10 times more often than was the case in the 1960s.

America’s Streams Are Awash With Pesticides Banned in Europe

You may have never heard of clothianidin, but it's probably in your local river.

How Textbooks Have Changed the Face of War

War is more personal, less glorious, and more hellish in modern textbooks than in the past. But there’s still room for improvement.

NASA Could Build Entire Spacecrafts in Space Using 3-D Printers

This year NASA will experiment with 3-D printing small objects in space. That could mark the beginning of a gravity-free manufacturing revolution.

The Big One

One in two full-time American fast-food workers' families are enrolled in public assistance programs, at a cost of $7 billion per year. July/August 2014

Copyright © 2014 by Pacific Standard and The Miller-McCune Center for Research, Media, and Public Policy. All Rights Reserved.