Menus Subscribe Search

Follow us


Jimmy Carter Wants to Finish Off Guinea Worm

• October 05, 2011 • 5:22 PM

The former U.S. president asks for $93 million to eradicate a neglected disease that lingers in the new Republic of South Sudan.

Former President Jimmy Carter joined the World Health Organization in London today to ask governments and nongovernmental organizations for $93 million in donations over four years to rid the world of guinea worm disease, a debilitating infection that still afflicts four African countries.

In 1980, about 3.5 million people in 20 countries suffered from guinea worm disease, an affliction so painful that it can immobilize sufferers for months. According to the World Health Organization, only 970 cases of guinea worm have been confirmed from January through August this year, primarily in the world’s newest nation, South Sudan, with a scattering in Ethiopia, Mali and Chad.

Now is the time to finish the job, Carter said. Britain has pledged to provide up to one-third of the needed funding over four years, depending on how much other countries contribute.

As Miller-McCune reported previously, guinea worm disease (or dracunculiasis) is on a list of 10 “neglected tropical diseases” affecting the world’s “bottom billion” people. Researchers have suggested that effective prevention or treatment strategies for all 10 of these diseases could be delivered for less than $1 per capita per year.

Carter is the founder of the Carter Center, an international nonprofit based in Atlanta, Ga., and a leader in the control and eradication of neglected tropical diseases since 1986.

There is no treatment or cure for guinea worm. People ingest the larvae by drinking stagnant water that is contaminated with water fleas. Inside the body, the worms can grow to be more than a yard long. About one year after infection, a blister forms, usually on the lower leg, and the worm tries to emerge. Adults with the disease may be unable to take on household chores, forcing older children to miss school for months on end.

Successful eradication of guinea worm disease means ensuring wider access to safe drinking water supplies (such as filters for drinking water), treating ponds to kill the water fleas, and detecting every case of the disease within 24 hours after a worm emerges.

Sign up for the free Miller-McCune.com e-newsletter.

“Like” Miller-McCune on Facebook.

Follow Miller-McCune on Twitter.

Add Miller-McCune.com news to your site.

Subscribe to Miller-McCune

Melinda Burns
Former Miller-McCune staff writer Melinda Burns was previously a senior writer for the Santa Barbara News-Press, covering immigration, urban planning, science, and the environment.

More From Melinda Burns

Tags: , ,

If you would like to comment on this post, or anything else on Pacific Standard, visit our Facebook or Google+ page, or send us a message on Twitter. You can also follow our regular updates and other stories on both LinkedIn and Tumblr.

A weekly roundup of the best of Pacific Standard and PSmag.com, delivered straight to your inbox.

Follow us


Subscribe Now

Quick Studies

How Junk Food Companies Manipulate Your Tongue

We mistakenly think that harder foods contain fewer calories, and those mistakes can affect our belt sizes.

What Steve Jobs’ Death Teaches Us About Public Health

Studies have shown that when public figures die from disease, the public takes notice. New research suggests this could be the key to reaching those who are most at risk.

Speed-Reading Apps Will Not Revolutionize Anything, Except Your Understanding

The one-word-at-a-time presentation eliminates the eye movements that help you comprehend what you're reading.

To Make Friends, Autistic Kids Need Advice—and Space

Kids with autism need help when it comes to making friends—but they also need their independence.

Gaming the Wedding Gift Registry System

Registering for your wedding? Keep your must-have items away from the average price of your registry—they’re unlikely to be purchased.

The Big One

One state—Pennsylvania—logs 52 percent of all sales, shipments, and receipts for the chocolate manufacturing industry. March/April 2014