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Call Us Names (Or At Least, Give Us Some …)

• September 21, 2011 • 6:12 PM

We’re renaming ourselves, and we thought our loyal readers may have some ideas for a new moniker.

Probably I shouldn’t admit this, but before writing to ask for your help, I pulled up the quote finder at Thesaurus.com and typed “name.” This came up: “The man who would change the name of Arkansas is the original, iron-jawed, brass-mouthed, copper-bellied corpse-maker from the wilds of the Ozarks! He is the man they call Sudden Death and General Desolation! Sired by a hurricane, dam’d by an earthquake, half-brother to the cholera …” It is attributed to an unknown, and certainly surly, Arkansan from the late 1880s.

Unlike our grumpy Arkansan, we at Miller-McCune would like to have another name, one that emphatically expresses what we are about. (What is a Miller-McCune, anyway?)

Editor-in-Chief Maria Streshinsky

I’ve been at Miller-McCune as editor-in-chief for almost eight weeks, and in that time we have been buzzing with ideas for our future: What will the next iteration of our print magazine look like when we redesign next spring? What will this website look like, and what new features will it have? And, most importantly, what exactly is a New-Name-to-Come story?

We want to give you stories that you never knew you wanted to read. These stories will be a research-based, data-driven conduit to primary sources at universities, think tanks, to people in the middle of policy decisions, all in search of solutions to some of the world’s most vexing problems. We aim to achieve that without pomposity and will strive not to be overly sober. We aim, after all, to turn some ideas on their heads.

Now we need a name to go with those notions. Tomorrow, our small staff will take another crack at The Name, to talk about words like “Smart” and “Think,” “Current” and “Cusp” and “Connect.” Or how about “Big Issues” or “Sharp Objects” or … ?

We could use your help, and if you have an idea feel free to comment here.

Thesaurus.com also points to Ecclesiastes: “A good name is better than precious ointment …” For now we’d even take some precious ointment. Help us find the “perfect/ideal/precise/faultless” name.

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Maria Streshinsky
Maria Streshinsky is the editor of Pacific Standard, and was formerly the managing editor of The Atlantic in Washington, D.C. She spent two years working at the U.S. Department of the Interior.

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