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biomedical-research

Do the Government’s Biomedical Initiatives Ever Lead to Medical Progress?

Over time, sure, but in the immediate future, social science will play a bigger role in any large-scale improvements to human health.

 

bermuda-triangle

Another Name for the Bermuda Triangle: The Ocean

Ships disappear everywhere, not just in the western North Atlantic Ocean.

 

random-cell

The Small Sample Size of Humanity

Comparisons to machines and information processors hide what’s most fascinating about the human body: its underlying randomness.

 

orange-genome

Do We Need to Be Protected From Our Genomes?

Despite the FDA’s recent ban on 23andMe’s personal genome analysis, we still don’t know how best to regulate personal genome information.

 

jury-prosecutor

The Emotions That Prosecutors Elicit to Make Jurors Vote Guilty

Jurors experiencing “moral outrage” will be more likely to convict, and changes in technology are making this a bigger factor.

 

csi-miami-lab

When Crime Labs Go Criminal

Annie Dookhan, the forensic scientist sent to prison last week for falsifying evidence, is just the tip of the iceberg.

 

scientist-dna

We Don’t Understand Life

Otherwise, we’d be able to build it from scratch.

 

near-death-experience

The Silly Science of Near-Death Experiences

There’s no way to prove whether or not someone’s had an out of body experience, but that hasn’t stopped scientists from trying to study the phenomenon.

 

gorilla-suit

Why an Invisible Gorilla Is a Security Threat

On “inattentional blindness” in security guards, and what to do about it.

 

genetic-test

The Frightening and Fraught Future of Genetic Testing

Will genetic testing inevitably become a part of all of our decision-making processes?

 

evolution

Are We Still Evolving?

Yep, but there’s a catch: Our identities might be too fluid for any advantageous mutations to take hold.

 

scientist-lab

Why Do Scientists Cheat?

Well, for starters, it’s actually pretty easy to.

 

face-recognition-security

Why You’re Able to Spot a Friend in a Crowd, Even When You Can’t See Their Face

And how new research on this common phenomenon will be used to improve controversial facial-recognition technology.

 

dna-computer

Wait, Could We Make a Computer Out of Our DNA?

Related: Why would we want to?

 

crime-lineup

The Limits of Memory for Witnesses of Crime

Using so much brainpower to make quick decisions during a crime keeps us from creating lasting memories.

 

octopus-tentacles

Planet of the Octopuses: What Animal Species Is Most Likely to Rise Up and Overthrow Humans?

It’s not something we need to worry too much about, but….

 

post-apocalypse

Your Genome Is a Post-Apocalyptic Wasteland

It’s way more than just a twisted ladder.

 

astrology

I Kind of, Sort of Might, But Not Really, Believe in Astrology

With little to no scientific evidence backing them, why do so many people still look at their horoscopes?

 

levy-model

Mapping (and Potentially Preventing) Crime With Math

Mathematicians propose using the “Lévy flight” model to reveal and police hotspots of crime.

 

bacteria

Living in a Bacterial World

The good news: Antibiotics didn’t create antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The bad news: Antibiotic-resistant bacteria is everywhere.

 

future-car

Crime-Stopping Cars of the Future

New computer technology could prevent hijacking, drunk driving, and high-speed chases.

 

bright-brain

How Did Our Brains Get So Brilliant?

Two words: open architecture.

 

liftport

Building an Elevator to Space

We traveled to Seattle’s Museum of Flight for the annual International Space Elevator Consortium to meet the engineers and space hippies that are working hard to realize the dream of one self-taught Russian scientist.

 

science-patient

Selling Your Body to Science

Medical research depends on human subjects, but should we pay people to be our guinea pigs?

 

accelerating-clock

Time Flying By? You’re Getting Old (and Stressed)

New research shows that time seems to move faster as we get older because we’re more stressed.

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The Rise of the Nuisance Flood

Minor floods are afflicting parts of Maryland nearly 10 times more often than was the case in the 1960s.

America’s Streams Are Awash With Pesticides Banned in Europe

You may have never heard of clothianidin, but it's probably in your local river.

How Textbooks Have Changed the Face of War

War is more personal, less glorious, and more hellish in modern textbooks than in the past. But there’s still room for improvement.

NASA Could Build Entire Spacecrafts in Space Using 3-D Printers

This year NASA will experiment with 3-D printing small objects in space. That could mark the beginning of a gravity-free manufacturing revolution.

The Most Popular Ways to Share Good and Bad Personal News

Researchers rank the popularity of all of the different methods we have for telling people about our lives, from Facebook to face-to-face.

The Big One

One in two full-time American fast-food workers' families are enrolled in public assistance programs, at a cost of $7 billion per year. July/August 2014

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