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Text Messages No Substitute for Mother’s Voice

A study finds girls’ stress levels decrease after speaking with mom, but not after text messaging.

 

Long-Term Love Not Just a Fairy Tale

A new study finds nearly three-quarters of Americans remain “very in love” after a decade of marriage.

 

Portraits Can Get Your Pulse Pounding

New research recording physiological reactions of museum-goers suggests we respond to art with our bodies as well as our brains.

 

Everyone’s a Critic: Babies Prefer Picasso

A study of 9-month-old babies found they prefer the brighter paintings of Picasso to the subtle shadings of Monet.

 

Accidental Deaths Linked to Macho Code of Honor

Accidental death rates are higher in states where challenges to one’s masculinity are taken seriously.

 

Extraverts More Likely to Believe in Free Will

Philosophers’ views on freedom and moral responsibility are influenced by inherited personality traits. If they can’t be objective, can anyone?

 

On Immigration Polls, a Lot of People Lie

UC Berkeley sociologist Alexander Janus says social desirability pressures cause some liberals to lie about their true opinion on immigration — even when asked in an anonymous poll.

 

Sarcasm Boosts Creativity? Yeah, Right.

New research from Israel suggests exposure to sarcasm may enhance creative thinking.

 

Sensory Deprivation Boosts Musicians’ Skill Level

Canadian researchers report floating in an isolation tank increased the technical skill level of young jazz players.

 

Religious Affiliation and Brain Shrinkage

New research finds membership in a minority religion seems to hasten a loss of volume of the hippocampal region of the brain.

 

Why Whites Avoid Movies With Black Actors

New research suggests white audiences tend to stay away from movies featuring minorities due to the assumption that they are not the films’ intended audience.

 

Teddy Bears Soften Pain of Social Exclusion

New research from Singapore suggests touching a stuffed animal can counteract the tendency of ostracized people to engage in antisocial behavior.

 

Study Links Facebook Use with Narcissism

New research from Australia suggests Facebook users are more extroverted and narcissistic than Internet users not plugged into the social network.

 

Dip in Arts Attendance Tied to Decline of the Omnivore

A new NEA study finds the group of people who regularly attend arts events is both shrinking and getting less active.

 

A Chimp Couldn’t Have Created That Painting

New research finds even nonexperts can differentiate between masterful abstract art and similar works painted by a child or an animal. See for yourself with our enclosed art quiz.

 

Staunching Aggression From the Womb

Government investment in prenatal and postnatal health care could help prevent violent behavior later in life, researcher says.

 

Misinformation is as Close as Your Inbox

New research suggests e-mail is an all-too-effective way of spreading false political rumors.

 

Wording Change Softens Global Warming Skeptics

New research finds Republicans scoff at “global warming,” but are much more receptive to the notion of “climate change.”

 

Benefits of Religion Limited to Fervent Believers

New research finds the well-documented link between religiosity and happiness applies only to those whose faith is robust.

 

Gratuity Examples on Receipts Net Bigger Tips

Dining customers tended to leave bigger tips when their bills spell out what 15 or 20 percent of their total amounts to.

 

Casual Sex: Men, Women Not So Different After All

New research suggests women turn down offers of casual sex for one good reason: They suspect — with some reason — they won’t enjoy it.

 

Cling to Youthful Appearance, Annoy Actual Youth

Forty may be the new 30, but young people don’t take kindly to elders trying to pass for their peers.

 

Guilt: A Double-Edged Sword

New research finds when we make amends to assuage our guilt, a third party often pays the price.

 

Smoggy Days Make for Sickly Stock Market

New research finds stock markets tend to close lower on days with poor air quality.

 

Classical Music Linked to High Intelligence

An evolutionary theorist provides evidence that intelligent individuals are more likely to enjoy purely instrumental music.

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Canadian Kids Have a Serious Smoking Problem

Bootleg cigarette sales could be leading Canadian teens to more serious drugs, a recent study finds.

The Hidden Psychology of the Home Ref

That old myth of home field bias isn’t a myth at all; it’s a statistical fact.

A Word of Caution to the Holiday Deal-Makers

Repeat customers—with higher return rates and real bargain-hunting prowess—can have negative effects on a company’s net earnings.

Crowdfunding Works for Science

Scientists just need to put forth some effort.

There’s More Than One Way to Be Good at Math

Mathematical ability isn’t one single skill set; there are indeed many ways to be “good at math,” research shows.

The Big One

One in two United States senators and two in five House members who left office between 1998 and 2004 became lobbyists. November/December 2014

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