Menus Subscribe Search

Follow us


Nature & Technology

Recent posts

Your Money

coffee-swirl

Would You Like a Subscription with Your Coffee?

A new app hopes to unite local coffee shops while helping you find a cheap cup of good coffee.

Go Outside

forest-oslo

How to Plant a Library

Somewhere outside of Oslo, there are 1,000 newly-planted spruce trees. One hundred years from now, if everything goes to plan, they’ll be published together as 100 pieces of art.

The World Wide Web

Marshall-McLuhan

The Medium Is the Message, 50 Years Later

Five decades on, what can Marshall McLuhan’s Understanding Media tell us about today?

OnEarth

oil-pipeline

Fast Track to a Spill?

Oil pipeline projects across America are speeding forward without environmental review.

Genes Are Us

sonic

Sonic Hedgehog, DICER, and the Problem With Naming Genes

Wait, why is there a Pokemon gene?

OnEarth

wildlife-1

Forging a New Path: Working to Build the Perfect Wildlife Corridor

When it comes to designing wildlife corridors, our most brilliant analytical minds are still no match for Mother Nature. But we’re getting there.

Hmmm

Plesiosaurus

A Brief History of the Loch Ness Monster

From 1933—and possibly much, much earlier—to just this past May, people have been claiming (and staging) sightings of the famed water cryptid.

Quick Studies

like

On the Hunt for Fake Facebook Likes

A new study finds ways to uncover Facebook Like farms.

Prospector

sept-oct-prospector-4

The Heist: How Visitors Stole a National Monument

Fossil Cycad National Monument was home to one of the world’s greatest collections of fossilized cycadeoids—until visitors carried them all away.

Quick Studies

greenhouse-gas-emissions

Carbon Taxes Really Do Work

A new study shows that taxing carbon dioxide emissions could actually work to reduce greenhouse gases without any negative effects on employment and revenues.

ProPublica

livejournal-art

Why Is LiveJournal Helping Russia Block a Prominent Critic of Vladimir Putin?

The U.S. blogging company is showing an error message to users inside Russia who try to read the blog of Alexei Navalny, a prominent politician and critic of the Russian government.

The World Wide Web

rude 4

Does Not Checking Your Buddy’s Facebook Updates Make You a Bad Friend?

An etiquette expert, a social scientist, and an old pal of mine ponder the ever-shifting rules of friendship.

Prospector

sept-oct-prospector-3

What Color Is Your Pygmy Goat?

The fierce battle over genetic purity, writ small. Very small.

OnEarth

(Photo: padu_foto/Shutterstock)

Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Plastic Bags

California wants you to pay for your plastic bags. (FYI: That’s not an infringement on your constitutional rights.)

The World Wide Web

twitter-twitter

Whispering in the Town Square: Can Twitter Provide an Escape From All Its Noise?

Twitter has created its own buzzing, digital agora, but when users want to speak amongst themselves, they tend to leave for another platform. It’s a social network that helps you find people to talk to—but barely lets you do any talking.

Genes Are Us

evolution-puzzle

How Ancient DNA Is Rewriting Human History

We thought we knew how we’d been shaped by evolution. We were wrong.

The Rest of the World

uber-ad

The Geography of Uber

If it continues to grow—and there are few reasons to think it won’t—will Uber transform the infrastructure of cities or glom onto what’s already there?

Mosaic

stripes

How the Zebra Got Its Stripes and the Leopard Its Spots

Where do a zebra’s stripes, a leopard’s spots, and our fingers come from? The key was found years ago—by the man who cracked the Enigma code.

ProPublica

california-drought

What You Should Read to Get Caught Up on California’s Drought Crisis

This year may be the driest in California in half a millennium. These reports explore how the drought is affecting agriculture, business, and living conditions in the nation’s most populous state.

Quick Studies

empty-classroom

The Downside of Giving Every Student a Laptop

A new study looks at the effects of access to a home computer on the test scores of middle school students.

ProPublica

cyber-security

A Recent History of China’s Cyber Attacks on the United States

A round-up of some of the most notable cyber attacks tied to China from the last several years.

Quick Studies

crowdfunding

Upfront Privacy Options Don’t Encourage Crowdfunding

While the average contribution increases, the number of donors falls.

Culture Essays

robots-lie

How Should We Program Computers to Deceive?

Placebo buttons in elevators and at crosswalks that don’t actually do anything are just the beginning. One computer scientist has collected hundreds of examples of technology designed to trick people, for better and for worse.

Randomness Week

darwin

True Darwinism Is All About Chance

Though the rich sometimes forget, Darwin knew that nature frequently rolls the dice.

A weekly roundup of the best of Pacific Standard and PSmag.com, delivered straight to your inbox.

Follow us


Mysterious Resting State Networks Might Be What Allow Different Brain Therapies to Work

Deep brain stimulation and similar treatments target the hubs of larger resting-state networks in the brain, researchers find.

Trust Is Waning, and Inequality May Be to Blame

Trust in others and confidence in institutions is declining, while economic inequality creeps up, a new study shows.

Dopamine Might Be Behind Impulsive Behavior

A monkey study suggests the brain chemical makes what's new and different more attractive.

School Counselors Do More Than You’d Think

Adding just one counselor to a school has an enormous impact on discipline and test scores, according to a new study.

How a Second Language Trains Your Brain for Math

Second languages strengthen the brain's executive control circuits, with benefits beyond words.

The Big One

One company, Amazon, controls 67 percent of the e-book market in the United States—down from 90 percent five years ago. September/October 2014 new-big-one-5

Copyright © 2014 by Pacific Standard and The Miller-McCune Center for Research, Media, and Public Policy. All Rights Reserved.