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Substance

The experiences of most young people with addiction are brushed under the carpet. (Photo: Substance)

Most People With Addiction Simply Grow Out of It. Why Is This Widely Denied?

The idea that addiction is typically a chronic, progressive disease that requires treatment is false, the evidence shows. Yet the “aging out” experience of the majority is ignored by treatment providers and journalists.

Findings

neurotic

Midlife Neuroticism Linked to Alzheimer’s Disease in Old Age

New research from Sweden suggests that the personality dimension is connected to who ultimately suffers from late-in-life dementia.

Quick Studies

Haxby2001

Mysterious Resting State Networks Might Be What Allow Different Brain Therapies to Work

Deep brain stimulation and similar treatments target the hubs of larger resting-state networks in the brain, researchers find.

Hmmm

graphology-book

The Psychology of Penmanship

Graphology: It’s all (probably) bunk.

Humanities

grad-head

Grad School’s Mental Health Problem

Navigating the emotional stress of doctoral programs in a down market.

Hmmm

sherlock

Searching for a Man Named Penis

A quest to track down a real Penis proves difficult.

Substance

addiction-liberal

Why Liberals Love the Disease Theory of Addiction, by a Liberal Who Hates It

The disease model is convenient to liberals because it spares them having to say negative things about poor communities. But this conception of addiction harms the very people we wish to help.

Quick Studies

dopamine crystals

Dopamine Might Be Behind Impulsive Behavior

A monkey study suggests the brain chemical makes what’s new and different more attractive.

Findings

empathy

The Dark Side of Empathy

New research finds the much-lauded feeling of identification with another person’s emotions can lead to unwarranted aggressive behavior.

Findings

ethnic-diversity

A Sense of Purpose Increases Comfort With Ethnic Diversity

White Americans who feel a sense of purpose in their lives are better able to accept coming demographic changes.

Substance

12-step-programs

What I’ve Finally Concluded About 12-Step Programs After 25 Years Writing About Drugs and Addiction

Alcoholics Anonymous and the rest remain the biggest and most polarizing force in the addiction community. I quit heroin and cocaine using the steps and have covered addiction as a journalist—and I’d argue that the picture is decidedly mixed.

Health Care

intensive-care-unit

Treated to Death

When your elite team of doctors, unwilling to admit defeat or accept failure, does more harm than good.

Quick Studies

brain

How a Second Language Trains Your Brain for Math

Second languages strengthen the brain’s executive control circuits, with benefits beyond words.

Quick Studies

blind 2

Would You Rather Go Blind or Lose Your Mind?

Americans consistently fear blindness, but how they compare it to other ailments varies across racial lines.

Findings

play-button

Let’s Watch the Video—and Confirm Our Prejudices

New research finds viewing a video of an ambiguous incident does not necessarily lead to more objective assessments of guilt and innocence.

ProPublica

pharmacy

A New Way Insurers Are Shifting Costs to the Sick

By charging higher prices for generic drugs that treat certain illness, health insurers may be violating the spirit of the Affordable Care Act, which bans discrimination against those with pre-existing conditions.

The Rest of the World

bangalore

The International Surrogacy Market

In Bangalore, where many women earn just $150 a month working in garment factories, surrogate mothers can make thousands of dollars by carrying others’ babies to term. But at what cost?

Health Care

home-health-care

Medicare: Your New Long-Term Care Provider

A 2013 court ruling has paved the way for an incredible, costly expansion of home health care by removing a critical lever the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services had to control who receives services, and for how long.

Health Care

ebola-virus-2

Why Science Won’t Defeat Ebola

While science will certainly help, winning the battle against Ebola is a social challenge.

The Things We Eat

meatless-monday

Burrito Treason in the Lone Star State

Did Meatless Mondays bring down Texas Agriculture Commissioner Todd Staples?

Quick Studies

beachwork

Savor Good Times, Get Through the Bad Ones—With Categories

Ticking off a category of things to do can feel like progress or a fun time coming to an end.

Findings

food-buffet

The Danger of Dining With an Overweight Companion

There’s a good chance you’ll eat more unhealthy food.

Sociological Images

prison-guard-tower

Racial Disparity in Imprisonment Inspires White People to Be Even More Tough on Crime

White Americans are more comfortable with punitive and harsh policing and sentencing when they imagine that the people being policed and put in prison are black.

True Crime

counterfeit-drugs

When Counterfeit and Contaminated Drugs Are Deadly

The cost and the crackdown, worldwide.

Sociological Images

online-dating

Can You Make Two People Like Each Other Just By Telling Them That They Should?

OKCupid manipulates user data in an attempt to find out.

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Mysterious Resting State Networks Might Be What Allow Different Brain Therapies to Work

Deep brain stimulation and similar treatments target the hubs of larger resting-state networks in the brain, researchers find.

Trust Is Waning, and Inequality May Be to Blame

Trust in others and confidence in institutions is declining, while economic inequality creeps up, a new study shows.

Dopamine Might Be Behind Impulsive Behavior

A monkey study suggests the brain chemical makes what's new and different more attractive.

School Counselors Do More Than You’d Think

Adding just one counselor to a school has an enormous impact on discipline and test scores, according to a new study.

How a Second Language Trains Your Brain for Math

Second languages strengthen the brain's executive control circuits, with benefits beyond words.

The Big One

One company, Amazon, controls 67 percent of the e-book market in the United States—down from 90 percent five years ago. September/October 2014 new-big-one-5

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