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Will DNA Be the Hard Drive of the Future?

If you can say it in words, you can store it in nucleotides, experimenters have confirmed. And is the new storage medium durable? You bet your Jurassic Park it is.

 

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The Touchy-Feely Future

Haptic technology is letting us get fresh with our devices. (But no, it’s not ready for porn yet.)

 

For Teens Online, Hundreds of ‘Friends’ and No One to Turn To

A tragic suicide underscores just how easy it is for teenagers to find trouble on the Web—and how hard it can be to escape the past.

 

Book Reviews: How the Wealth Gap Damages Democracy

Two new books explain the rise of economic inequality, and suggestthe rich are different than you or me: they have more political influence.

 

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Facebook: Saving Lives, One Kidney at a Time

Repressed death anxiety leads most of us to avoid becoming organ donors. Psychologists report Facebook may help change all that.

 

Television Violence Enticing, But Not Satisfying

New research finds people enjoy less-gory versions of television shows, even when they are enticed to watch by a graphically violent description.

 

Announcing Our New Name

Miller-McCune is renaming, and relaunching under the new moniker: “Pacific Standard.”

 

Bitter About Your Life? Blame Facebook

New research suggests heavy Facebook users are more likely to believe other people have happier lives.

 

Miller-McCune’s Top Stories of 2011

A looming government shutdown, faulty comet theories, clever transit alternatives, and women’s gaydar were among the top topics Miller-McCune readers flocked to in 2011.

 

Pop Charts Still Dominated by Men

New research finds predictions made in the late 1990s that women were nearing equality in pop music have failed to materialize.

 

Two Russian Films Give Differing Views of Motherland

“Khodorkovsky” and “Hipsters,” two wildly different films currently making rounds of U.S., suggest that each step forward in Russia is greeted with one step back.

 

Securing Nebulous Privacy Rights in the Cloud

The cloud may be a blessing to global business, but it remains a major headache for sovereign states determined to protect its citizens’ privacy.

 

Searing Look at Rio’s Homicidal Police

As Brazil prepares to host two high-profile global events, filmmaker José Padilha suggests that while improving security is a worthy goal, its methods and rationale are deeply flawed.

 

PBS to Show ‘Where Soldiers Come From’

A PBS documentary follows a group of friends before, during, and after their time in Afghanistan.

 

Civil Rights Groups’ Surprising Net-Neutrality Bedfellows

The fight over whether the Internet should have a meter has created some unexpected alliances in the groups lobbying the FCC.

 

Call Us Names (Or At Least, Give Us Some …)

We’re renaming ourselves, and we thought our loyal readers may have some ideas for a new moniker.

 

Culturomics 2.0 Aims to Predict Future Events

By analyzing tens of millions of news stories, a supercomputer in Tennessee may be able to predict future human events.

 

Spy Agency Seeks Digital Mosaic to Divine Future

The U.S. intelligence community wants to mine lots and lots of the tidbits bopping around on the Internet to suss out trends before they make the news.

 

‘If a Tree Falls’ Revisits the Earth Liberation Front

PBS looks at the radical environmentalists whose turn to terrorism discredited their quixotic campaign in “If a Tree Falls.”

 

Analyzing Culture with Google Books: Is It Social Science?

OPINION: Discovering fun facts by graphing terms found among the 5 million volumes of the Google Books project sure is amusing — but this pursuit dubbed ‘culturomics’ is not the same as being an historian.

 

Scholars and The Big Lebowski: Deconstructing The Dude

In honor of the 10th annual Lebowski Fest in Louisville, Ky., Miller-McCune looks at the scholarly papers inspired by the Coen brothers’ 1998 film “The Big Lebowski.”

 

How Google Disrespected Mexican History

Opinion: Anything can happen when Google gets involved in digitizing national treasure troves of archived information, warns a frustrated scholar.

 

The Last Mountain: A Scary Movie About … Coal

In his film review of “The Last Mountain,” Lewis Beale describes a horror flick about environmental degradation and predatory capitalism.

 

Welcome to Shelbyville: Loving, Fearing Thy Neighbors

In the documentary film “Welcome to Shelbyville,” a small Tennessee town deals with an influx of residents from Somalia.

 

WikiLeaks and the Future of Whistle-blowing

In the run-up to a debate on WikiLeaks, Julian Assange’s attorney discusses the uncomfortable relationship between the free flow of ideas and the inclination of governments to make everything a secret.

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NASA Could Build Entire Spacecrafts in Space Using 3-D Printers

This year NASA will experiment with 3-D printing small objects in space. That could mark the beginning of a gravity-free manufacturing revolution.

The Most Popular Ways to Share Good and Bad Personal News

Researchers rank the popularity of all of the different methods we have for telling people about our lives, from Facebook to face-to-face.

Do Not Tell Your Kids That Eating Vegetables Will Make Them Stronger

Instead, hand them over in silence. Or, market them as the most delicious snack known to mankind.

The West’s Groundwater Is Being Sucked Dry

Scientists were stunned to discover just how much groundwater has been lost from beneath the Colorado River over the past 10 years.

How Wildlife Declines Are Leading to Slavery and Terrorism

As wildlife numbers dwindle, wildlife crimes are rising—and that's fueling a raft of heinous crimes committed against humans.

The Big One

One in two full-time American fast-food workers' families are enrolled in public assistance programs, at a cost of $7 billion per year. July/August 2014

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