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How Norman Borlaug Went With the Grain

“Our Daily Bread: The Essential Norman Borlaug” is a multivolume biography that chronicles the microbiologist and his Nobel Prize-winning work to thwart starvation.

 

Explaining Liberals to Conservatives, and Vice-Versa

Psychologist Jonathan Haidt can tell you why you feel so righteous about your politics, but will you listen?

 

Does Black History Need More Than a Month?

The documentary “More Than a Month” asks: Does Black History Month still inspire reflection, or just Nike sales?

 

PBS to Show ‘Where Soldiers Come From’

A PBS documentary follows a group of friends before, during, and after their time in Afghanistan.

 

‘If a Tree Falls’ Revisits the Earth Liberation Front

PBS looks at the radical environmentalists whose turn to terrorism discredited their quixotic campaign in “If a Tree Falls.”

 

Teaching Kids to Love Nature (and Buy Less Stuff)

A new book, “The Failure of Environmental Education,” says schools are failing to teach kids how to save the planet.

 

‘The Fair Society’ — Author Calls for More Equality

Social critic Peter Corning argues for a new social structure based on equality, equity and reciprocity in his new book “The Fair Society.”

 

Invasion of the Unregulated Chemicals

Carl Cranor’s book “Legally Poisoned” says lax, outdated law puts Americans at risk from untested industrial chemicals.

 

Welcome to Shelbyville: Loving, Fearing Thy Neighbors

In the documentary film “Welcome to Shelbyville,” a small Tennessee town deals with an influx of residents from Somalia.

 

Mentally Ill Homeless Improve With Group Living

Bucking a trend, a new book shows that group living can inoculate the homeless who are mentally ill against a return to the streets.

 

Lee Baca Wants to Educate L.A.’s Prisoners

In this Miller-McCune Q&A, Los Angeles County’s top cop Lee Baca explains why he wants to offer an education to tens of thousands of prisoners.

 

How Did Students Become Academically Adrift?

“Academically Adrift,” a new book on the failures of higher education, finds that undergrads don’t study, and professors don’t make them.

 

Derek Bok on Fixing College Failure

Harvard University President Emeritus Derek Bok says college professors don’t challenge their students because they don’t know how.

 

David Onek — Law Enforcement Facilitator

David Onek works to bring together stakeholders in the criminal justice system who often agree — usually without knowing they do.

 

Life in Prison Begins at 16

The PBS documentary “Me Facing Life: Cyntoia’s Story” asks the question: Who is responsible when family and society so fail a promising child that she turns to prostitution and murder in her teens?

 

Your Brain: A User’s Guide

New books “Self Comes to Mind” and “On Second Thought” examine the origins of consciousness, and the unconscious pulls that influence our behavior.

 

The Ultra-Imperial Presidency

Yale’s Bruce Ackerman, a constitutional scholar, warns that unilateralism in the “most dangerous branch” of government is setting the stage for a tragic future.

 

Welfare Reform Failing Poor Single Mothers

“Stretched Thin,” “Both Hands Tied,” and “The War on Welfare” are three new books that highlight welfare reform’s failure to address the enduring poverty of single mothers and their children.

 

Mountaintop-Removal Coal Mining Hits ‘Deep Down’

PBS documentary “Deep Down” looks at a cordial, intense dispute over mountaintop-removal coal mining in Appalachia.

 

World Press Photos in Focus

Ready for a close-up: The year in award-winning photojournalism presented by the World Press Photo Exhibition.

 

What We Miss When We Obsess Over Obesity

Social epidemiologist Paula Lantz reveals what actually leads to premature deaths among Americans. Obesity? No. Poverty? Yes.

 

The Poverty Solution: Cash

A new book, “Just Give Money to the Poor,” says the poor will spend the cash wisely and boost the economy, too.

 

Prisoners of the States

A new book, “The Enemy In Our Hands,” looks at how America has treated — and mistreated — prisoners of war through history resonates in the age of terror.

 

‘Courts and Kids’ Argues for Equal School Funding

State courts should stand firm on equal school funding and make sure legislators and governors show kids the money, a law scholar writes.

 

The Sociology of Avatar, The X Files and The Simpsons

Scouring “Avatar,” “The X Files” and, yes, even “The Simpsons” for sociological subtext.

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How Textbooks Have Changed the Face of War

War is more personal, less glorious, and more hellish in modern textbooks than in the past. But there’s still room for improvement.

NASA Could Build Entire Spacecrafts in Space Using 3-D Printers

This year NASA will experiment with 3-D printing small objects in space. That could mark the beginning of a gravity-free manufacturing revolution.

The Most Popular Ways to Share Good and Bad Personal News

Researchers rank the popularity of all of the different methods we have for telling people about our lives, from Facebook to face-to-face.

Do Not Tell Your Kids That Eating Vegetables Will Make Them Stronger

Instead, hand them over in silence. Or, market them as the most delicious snack known to mankind.

The West’s Groundwater Is Being Sucked Dry

Scientists were stunned to discover just how much groundwater has been lost from beneath the Colorado River over the past 10 years.

The Big One

One in two full-time American fast-food workers' families are enrolled in public assistance programs, at a cost of $7 billion per year. July/August 2014

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