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04. Nov/Dec 2012

Features

A Giant Leap Forward

Forced to go it alone into space, China has reaped the benefits of building an aerospace industry from the ground up. Now that the future of America’s program looks most uncertain, China may be poised to slingshot ahead.

The Music Man

Steven Angel uses drumming to teach literacy. Across L.A., juvenile-detention centers, schools, and libraries have fallen in love with his program. But scientists say there’s no reason to believe it should work.

Speak, Memory

How the science of recall is finally helping us to learn other languages.

The Death Penalty Is Experiencing Technical Difficulties

How legal wrangling over the chemicals used in lethal injection could shut down capital punishment.

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The Big One

Our look at the little things in life that loom large.

 

PS PAGE LAYOUT NEW4.2

INFOGRAPHIC: A Whole New Ballpark

How Los Angeles can beat the odds and make money off its stadium.

 

Worthman-lo

Good Night, Vietnam

Why this Emory prof is studying the sleeping habits of villagers halfway around the world

 

Basilica of San Francesco d'Assisi

Corridors of the Mind

Could neuroscientists be the next great architects?

 

(ILLUSTRATION: GRAHAM SMITH)

Mouse-Infest Destiny

Most of our homes are soaked in mouse urine. It’s at the core of our asthma epidemic—but it helps rodents stay connected.

 

Crowds in Shanghai, China (PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK)

False Clarity, Authentic Confusion

An American strategist’s broadside pales beside a stunning account of how ordinary Chinese grapple with the enigma of their own country.

 

Optimistic Robot

The Love Bot

The danger of falling for a machine that’s just not that into you

Features

death-penalty

The Death Penalty Is Experiencing Technical Difficulties

How legal wrangling over the chemicals used in lethal injection could shut down capital punishment.

 

Bond

The Least Interesting Man in the World

Created as a figure with no personality, James Bond has survived half a century because of what we keep throwing at him—and projecting onto him.

Features

Illustration: Sébastien Thibault

Speak, Memory

How the science of recall is finally helping us to learn other languages.

Features

Minolta DSC

The Music Man

Steven Angel uses drumming to teach literacy. Across L.A., juvenile-detention centers, schools, and libraries have fallen in love with his program. But scientists say there’s no reason to believe it should work.

Features

This picture taken on June 9, 2012 shows

A Giant Leap Forward

Forced to go it alone into space, China has reaped the benefits of building an aerospace industry from the ground up. Now that the future of America’s program looks most uncertain, China may be poised to slingshot ahead.

 

Waiting in the Wings

INFOGRAPHIC: The loyal leaders who could be the next to rule Cuba

 

Fidel Castro - Dynasty

We’ll Always Have Fidel

Over the last five years, the Castro Brothers have carefully groomed a cadre of would-be successors. Veteran Cuba watcher Ann Louise Bardach explains why, even after El Comandante is dead, El Comandante will live a long time.

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NASA Could Build Entire Spacecrafts in Space Using 3-D Printers

This year NASA will experiment with 3-D printing small objects in space. That could mark the beginning of a gravity-free manufacturing revolution.

The Most Popular Ways to Share Good and Bad Personal News

Researchers rank the popularity of all of the different methods we have for telling people about our lives, from Facebook to face-to-face.

Do Not Tell Your Kids That Eating Vegetables Will Make Them Stronger

Instead, hand them over in silence. Or, market them as the most delicious snack known to mankind.

The West’s Groundwater Is Being Sucked Dry

Scientists were stunned to discover just how much groundwater has been lost from beneath the Colorado River over the past 10 years.

How Wildlife Declines Are Leading to Slavery and Terrorism

As wildlife numbers dwindle, wildlife crimes are rising—and that's fueling a raft of heinous crimes committed against humans.

The Big One

One in two full-time American fast-food workers' families are enrolled in public assistance programs, at a cost of $7 billion per year. July/August 2014

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