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02. Jul/Aug 2012

Features

Weaponizing Mosquitoes to Fight Tropical Diseases

How scientists are fighting malaria and dengue fever by turning disease-carrying bugs into their own worst enemies.

A State of Military Mind

To train future soldiers, the Department of Defense is using new technologies and centuries-old techniques, like yoga and meditation, to hone their minds, help them make better decisions on the battlefield, and prevent trauma.

Pacific Rim Trade: a Great Blue Highway Out There

The staggering, often surprising, scope of stuff being bought and sold across the Pacific.

Just Breathe: Confirming Meditation’s Benefits

Plenty of followers swear by meditation to cure a long list of ails. But how does it work? Neuroscientist Clifford Saron, of the University of California, Davis, and a Who’s Who of peers, are spending millions to find out.

A Twist of Faiths: Claremont’s Mission to Desegregate Religion

The Claremont School of Theology, founded 126 years ago to create Methodist ministers, has plans to train rabbis and imams alongside its Christian preachers. The alliance, Claremont administrators say, will create the nation’s first Islamic seminary, awarding the country’s first graduate degrees in Muslim leadership. But the idea has agitated people inside and outside the institution.

Aversion to Therapy: Why Won’t Men Get Help?

Research shows that men benefit from talk therapy just as much, if not more, than women. Yet most men still won’t go.

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Scene from 1939 movie 'The Wizard of Oz'

To Find America, Follow the Yellow Brick Road

New books, movies, and plays keep spilling out of the perennial wellspring of Oz. Each reveals a facet of that fabled land—and of the generation that produces the work.

 

Two speakers taped to trees in woods

Silence’s Loud Goodbye

Cries for turning down the volume on Earth grow louder, but can they be heard over the din of a noise-pollution epidemic?

 

Thaddeus Cahill's chair-mounted headphones

Bring on the Noise

 

Cartoon mouse with cellphone

From AT&T to ADHD

Too much cell phone time for mouse moms makes for brain-addled babies.

 

Babak Parviz

Researchers & Discoveries: An Eye for Medicine

University of Washington bionanotechnologist Babak Parviz on medical technology that can live on a contact lens

 

Abstract graphic representation of breast cancer screening

Mammograms: The Year of Living Dangerously?

Three years ago, a health task force sparked a heated debate when it recommended that women between 40 and 50 stop getting mammograms every year. Did timing, insurance, and emotion quash their findings?

 

Detangling whale

Freeing Tangled Leviathans: The Whale Wrangler

The world’s largest animals get snarled in every kind of sea gear that has rope—mooring lines, gillnets, shrimp pots, anchors. Scott Landry figures out how to wrestle them free.

 

Man talking to therapist

Have You Heard the One About the Guy with Prostate Cancer?

Should therapists be turning to football and jokes to reach a wider audience of men in need?

Features

Image of stressed-out man

Aversion to Therapy: Why Won’t Men Get Help?

Research shows that men benefit from talk therapy just as much, if not more, than women. Yet most men still won’t go.

Features

Books from different religious traditions

A Twist of Faiths: Claremont’s Mission to Desegregate Religion

The Claremont School of Theology, founded 126 years ago to create Methodist ministers, has plans to train rabbis and imams alongside its Christian preachers. The alliance, Claremont administrators say, will create the nation’s first Islamic seminary, awarding the country’s first graduate degrees in Muslim leadership. But the idea has agitated people inside and outside the institution.

 

Delta IV rocket launches from Vandenberg

Going Ballistic: From Cold War to Commercial Space

California’s Vandenberg Air Force base has sent nearly 2,000 missiles blasting skyward. Soon, it will also send up Elon Musk’s latest—and biggest—private space rocket.

Features

Profile of Face with Swirls

Just Breathe: Confirming Meditation’s Benefits

Plenty of followers swear by meditation to cure a long list of ails. But how does it work? Neuroscientist Clifford Saron, of the University of California, Davis, and a Who’s Who of peers, are spending millions to find out.

Features

Preview of global trade graphic

Pacific Rim Trade: a Great Blue Highway Out There

The staggering, often surprising, scope of stuff being bought and sold across the Pacific.

 

Letter from the Editor

Features

Navy SEAL candidates hit the beach

A State of Military Mind

To train future soldiers, the Department of Defense is using new technologies and centuries-old techniques, like yoga and meditation, to hone their minds, help them make better decisions on the battlefield, and prevent trauma.

 

Astrobiologist Kevin Hand

Prometheus Adviser Kevin Hand: Aliens’ Advance Man

When Prometheus director Ridley Scott wanted help conceiving his imaginary space creatures, he called one of NASA’s real-life ET-hunters.

Features

Artist's conception of mechanized mosquito

Weaponizing Mosquitoes to Fight Tropical Diseases

How scientists are fighting malaria and dengue fever by turning disease-carrying bugs into their own worst enemies.

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When Men Who Abstain From Premarital Sex Get Married

Young men who take abstinence pledges have trouble adjusting to sexual norms when they become husbands.

Your Brain Decides Whether to Trust Someone in Milliseconds

We can determine trustworthiness even when we’re only subliminally aware of the other person.

Young, Undocumented, and Invisible

While young migrant workers struggle under poor working conditions, U.S. policy has done little to help.

Education, Interrupted

When it comes to educational access, young Syrian refugees are becoming a “lost generation.”

No, Smartphone-Loss Anxiety Disorder Isn’t Real

But people are anxious about losing their phones, even if they don’t do much to protect them.

The Big One

One third of the United States federal budget for fighting wildfires goes toward one percent of such fires. September/October 2014 big-one-fires-final

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