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11. Jan/Feb 2014

Features

Why Women Aren’t Welcome on the Internet

“Ignore the barrage of violent threats and harassing messages that confront you online every day.” That’s what women are told. But these relentless messages are an assault on women’s careers, their psychological bandwidth, and their freedom to live online. We have been thinking about Internet harassment all wrong.

A Toast Story

How did toast become the latest artisanal food craze? Ask a trivial question, get a profound, heartbreaking answer.

Obama’s Not-So-Big Data

After the last presidential election, wide-eyed pundits hailed a brave new era of political campaigning, crediting Obama’s victory to his team’s wizardry with data. The hype was premature. Here’s what the story of 2012 really means for the future of politics.

All posts

Quick Studies

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Want to Get Rich? Get Fit

A new study finds that your long-term income could be closely tied to regular exercise.

Shelf Help

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Shelf Help: New Book Reviews in 100 Words or Less

What you need to know about The Proteus Paradox, For the Benefit of Those Who See, and Promise Land.

In the Picture

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In the Picture

In every issue, we fix our gaze on an everyday photograph and chase down facts about details in the frame.

Prospector

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How Farouk al Kasim Saved Norway From Its Oil

After growing up watching the benefits of Iraqi oil elude the Iraqi people, a young executive insisted that Norway do things differently.

Culture Essays

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What’s In Your Bag, America?

Popular culture has become obsessed with peering into people’s bags. Disclosing the things we carry has become a national pastime. But what are we hiding?

Quick Studies

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Grand Obese Party?

Researchers have found a statistically significant correlation between support for Mitt Romney and a pudgy populace.

There's a Name for That

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Why People Have So Much Trouble Recognizing Their Own Incompetence

There’s a name for that: the Dunning-Kruger Effect.

Prospector

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Prairie Home Companions

A homecoming in Red Cloud, Nebraska.

Features

obama-data-1

Obama’s Not-So-Big Data

After the last presidential election, wide-eyed pundits hailed a brave new era of political campaigning, crediting Obama’s victory to his team’s wizardry with data. The hype was premature. Here’s what the story of 2012 really means for the future of politics.

Quick Studies

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Forget the Blue Plate Special: I’ll Have the Red Plate Dieter’s Meal

Trying to lose weight? The color of your crockery could make all the difference.

Subculture

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Is There a Global Effort to Eradicate Deaf People?

Exploring subculture in America.

Prospector

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Is the Will to Work Out Genetically Determined?

What a 94-year-old athlete and an obsessive albino mouse can teach us about habits.

Book Reviews

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The Goofy Origins and Dismal Track Record of Modern Economic Forecasting

In Fortune Tellers, Walter Friedman shows not only where our contemporary forecasting ecosystem came from, but also its considerable influence on present-day economic thought and practice.

Features

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A Toast Story

How did toast become the latest artisanal food craze? Ask a trivial question, get a profound, heartbreaking answer.

Life in the Data

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Is Strava Taking All of the Joy Out of Running?

Why you shouldn’t be so focused on the final numbers.

Five Studies

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Minority Rule: How Labor Unions and Civil Rights Activists Beat the Big Guys

The whole idea of a democracy is that the majority is generally supposed to get its way. But time and again, it’s not the majority but a potent minority that drives—or prevents—progress.

Book Reviews

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Through a Data Set, Darkly

Is quantitative analysis the secret to understanding culture?

Who Funded That?

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Who Funded That?

The names and numbers behind the research in the January/February 2014 print issue of Pacific Standard.

Social Networking

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Social Networking

Letters and other responses to stories from the November/December print issue of Pacific Standard.

Contributors

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Magazine Contributors

Meet some of the people behind the January/February 2014 issue of Pacific Standard.

Economics Essays

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The Quest to Improve America’s Financial Literacy Is Both a Failure and a Sham

Financial literacy promotion may sound perfectly sensible—who wouldn’t want to teach children and adults the secrets of managing money?—but in the face of recent research it looks increasingly like a faith-based initiative.

Conference Call

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3 Conferences Happening in January and February That Are Worth Attending

From Managing Popular Culture? to Social Media in the Pharmaceutical Industry, academic gatherings you should be aware of.

From the Editor

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Editor’s Letter: Real Enough

Introducing the January/February 2014 Issue of Pacific Standard.

Datebook

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6 Events Happening in January and February That You Should Be Aware Of

From the trial of Aurora Batman shooter James Holmes to the opening of the Sundance Film Festival, dates you might want to watch.

A weekly roundup of the best of Pacific Standard and PSmag.com, delivered straight to your inbox.

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Feeling—Not Being—Wealthy Cuts Support for Economic Redistribution

Study suggests it's relative wealth that leads people to oppose taxing the rich and giving to the poor.

Sufferers of Social Anxiety Disorder, Your Friends Like You

The first study of friends' perceptions suggest they know something's off with their pals but like them just the same.

Standing Up for My Group by Kicking Yours

Members of a minority ethnic group are less likely to express support for gay equality if they believe their own group suffers from discrimination.

How Old Brains Learn New Tricks

A new study shows that the neural plasticity needed for learning doesn't vanish as we age—it just moves.

Ethnic Diversity Deflates Market Bubbles

But it's not in the rainbow and sing-along way you'd hope for. We just don't trust outsiders' judgments.

The Big One

One in two United States senators and two in five House members who left office between 1998 and 2004 became lobbyists. November/December 2014

Copyright © 2014 by Pacific Standard and The Miller-McCune Center for Research, Media, and Public Policy. All Rights Reserved.