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March-April 2012

Features

Overcrowded Prisons Giving Old Inmates New Life

Aging prisoners serving long sentences are filling overcrowded lockups across the nation. Colorado prison officials hope a new program will help let some of these old guys get out — and stay out.

Insuring Livestock in Kenya, Via Satellite

Camels mean cash in Kenya. But severe drought routinely kills off livestock, and families go bankrupt, unless they have an innovative insurance plan.

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Working Moms: The Kids Are All Right

Working mothers tend to be happier and healthier than mothers who stay at home caring for young children.

 

Coworking Offices Abuzz With Independent Workers

Starbucks may have become America’s other office, but coworking offices — where people can rent a desk are popping up around the nation.

 

OMG UR Phone Knows UR Texting + Driving!

By analyzing keystrokes of cell phone texters, researchers have developed a way to keep drivers’ hands on the wheel and off their mobile device.

 

Who’s Saving Electricity in Your Neighborhood?

Software company Opower thinks it can get consumers to use less electricity by instigating some friendly neighborhood competition.

 

Great Dessert? Depends on the Plate

Desserts are sweeter on white plates, comedians are kinder off stage, and small feet are more attractive … in our latest Cocktail Napkin.

 

How Norman Borlaug Went With the Grain

“Our Daily Bread: The Essential Norman Borlaug” is a multivolume biography that chronicles the microbiologist and his Nobel Prize-winning work to thwart starvation.

 

Breeding Tropical Fish to Save Their Schools

For every tropical fish that becomes a pet, four are killed. Joan Holt wants to take the violence out of their world.

 

Library Parks Foster Community in Colombia

Medellín, Colombia’s “library parks” — built for its poorest residents — are bringing sanity and community to one of the world’s most violent cities.

 

Insuring Livestock in Kenya, Via Satellite

Camels mean cash in Kenya. But severe drought routinely kills off livestock, and families go bankrupt, unless they have an innovative insurance plan.

 

Why LeBron Can’t Take the Heat

How even an NBA all-star like LeBron James can falter under pressure … and other research insights from the world of basketball.

 

Study: Mother-Daughter Talks Need More Math

Why do young girls lack confidence in math? One study shows American parents are far more likely to talk numbers with young sons than daughters.

 

Explaining Liberals to Conservatives, and Vice-Versa

Psychologist Jonathan Haidt can tell you why you feel so righteous about your politics, but will you listen?

 

Overcrowded Prisons Giving Old Inmates New Life

Aging prisoners serving long sentences are filling overcrowded lockups across the nation. Colorado prison officials hope a new program will help let some of these old guys get out — and stay out.

 

Announcing Our New Name

Miller-McCune is renaming, and relaunching under the new moniker: “Pacific Standard.”

 

Will Nigeria’s ‘Airport City’ Dreams Take Flight?

Developers and politicians hope a new airport-cum-city near the African nation’s capital will bring some stability — and respect — to the troubled region.

 

Is Radiation Actually Good For Some of Us?

By age 10, most people are exposed to enough radiation to be at risk, but the science is so complicated that exposure could even have benefits.

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Attitudes About Race Affect Actions, Even When They Don’t

Tiny effects of attitudes on individuals' actions pile up quickly.

Geography, Race, and LOLs

The online lexicon spreads through racial and ethnic groups as much as it does through geography and other traditional linguistic measures.

Feeling—Not Being—Wealthy Cuts Support for Economic Redistribution

A new study suggests it's relative wealth that leads people to oppose taxing the rich and giving to the poor.

Sufferers of Social Anxiety Disorder, Your Friends Like You

The first study of friends' perceptions suggest they know something's off with their pals but like them just the same.

Standing Up for My Group by Kicking Yours

Members of a minority ethnic group are less likely to express support for gay equality if they believe their own group suffers from discrimination.

The Big One

One in two United States senators and two in five House members who left office between 1998 and 2004 became lobbyists. November/December 2014

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