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Peak Urbanization

Is it just you or is everyone hatching plans to move somewhere less expensive?

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Leaning Out

By intentionally taking a step back from a career she worked hard to start, Alice Dreger estimates she has cost her family $750,000. Was it worth it?

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Bright Flight From Silicon Valley

Talented people are starting to move to places where the cost of living is more reasonable, but a town can’t just be cheap and wonderful. It also has to be connected.

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Chicago’s Disappearing Middle Class

An animation using Census data makes clear how family income has changed in America’s Second City over 40-plus years.

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Why Don’t We Have Ads on Sports Uniforms Yet?

While a San Francisco 49ers jersey with a Facebook badge across the chest might seem inevitable, it’s still not a reality.

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The 30 Top Thinkers Under 30: The Accomplished Economist Who Wants to Empower Whole Societies

For the month of April we’re profiling the individuals who made our inaugural list of the 30 top thinkers under 30, the young men and women we predict will have a serious impact on the social, political, and economic issues we cover every day here at Pacific Standard.

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Does That Restaurant Rate 4 Stars? Sure—on a Sunny Day

New research finds online restaurant reviews are influenced by the weather.

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This Is Why Cartoons on Cereal Boxes Leer at Your Children

When a cartoon character gazes into our eyes from a cereal box, it increases our trust in the brand and our connection with it.

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Silicon Rust

Silicon Shore. Silicon Beach. Silicon Roundabout. How many different technology hubs can we have? Like the untethering of manufacturing from regional natural resources that crushed the Rust Belt, Silicon Valley’s one-time advantage of a high concentration of venture capitalists matters less and less as the cost of technology falls.

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The Not-So-Surprising Way Your Parents’ Income Predicts Yours

Just as you suspected, there’s a reason inequality is structural and self-perpetuating. But you might be shocked by just how few of the most well-off individuals are able to out-earn the generation before them. It isn’t the one percent we should be focusing on, but the 0.1 percent.

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Quick Studies

How Junk Food Companies Manipulate Your Tongue

We mistakenly think that harder foods contain fewer calories, and those mistakes can affect our belt sizes.

What Steve Jobs’ Death Teaches Us About Public Health

Studies have shown that when public figures die from disease, the public takes notice. New research suggests this could be the key to reaching those who are most at risk.

Speed-Reading Apps Will Not Revolutionize Anything, Except Your Understanding

The one-word-at-a-time presentation eliminates the eye movements that help you comprehend what you're reading.

To Make Friends, Autistic Kids Need Advice—and Space

Kids with autism need help when it comes to making friends—but they also need their independence.

Gaming the Wedding Gift Registry System

Registering for your wedding? Keep your must-have items away from the average price of your registry—they’re unlikely to be purchased.

The Big One

One state—Pennsylvania—logs 52 percent of all sales, shipments, and receipts for the chocolate manufacturing industry. March/April 2014