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(ILLUSTRATION: GRAHAM SMITH)

Mouse-Infest Destiny

Most of our homes are soaked in mouse urine. It’s at the core of our asthma epidemic—but it helps rodents stay connected.

 

The Neurobiology of Fear

New clues into why some of us get stuck in a state of anxiety and others chill

 

‘The Pill’ for Men

 

Cartoon mouse with cellphone

From AT&T to ADHD

Too much cell phone time for mouse moms makes for brain-addled babies.

 

Apples as Diet Food

Apples: An Anti-Obesity Pill?

Could an apple a day help keep obesity away? In a new study, researchers at the University of Iowa found that ursolic acid, a compound found in the waxy skin of apples, increased muscle mass and reduced total body weight. The researchers put two groups of mice on high-fat diets where 55% of their calories […]

 

Rodents in the News

A week’s worth of mice, rats and other rodents in the headlines.

 

Secondhand Smoke Linked to Dementia

New research from Hong Kong reports changes in the brains of rats which were regularly exposed to smoky air.

 

Less Intestines, Less Diabetes

 

High Fructose Cram Session

Processed sugar isn’t just a recipe for obesity—it may also hurt your ability to learn.

 

Classical Music Boosts Heart Transplant Survival in Mice

Japanese researchers report mice who underwent heart transplants survived much longer if they were exposed to Mozart or Verdi.

 

Ritalin Can Wake the Brain From Anesthesia

Researchers propose pulling patients out of anesthesia with “a shot of adrenaline to the brain.”

 

More Reasons Not to Skip Your Broccoli

A University of Illinois study shows that healthy gut flora and daily doses of broccoli — even when it’s been cooked to within an inch of its life — help fight cancer.

 

Listening for the Key to Reverse Aging

New research on responding to sound may have found a key to reversing, or even preventing, one of the effects of aging.

 

Science Comes to the Rescue of Lab Rats

Scientists at Tel Aviv University are bioengineering tissues that can take the place of lab rats, saving untold lives.

 

Teaching an Old Immune System New Tricks

Researchers have found a protein that may be the immune system’s fountain of youth.

 

Turning Off Huntington’s Disease

Amending the unmutated part of the mutated protein that causes a neurodegenerative disease may lead to a cure.

 

Attacking Breast Cancer in its Heel

Research suggests a possible specific target for drugs fighting the most common type of breast cancer.

 

Teen Steroid Use Suppresses Submissiveness

New research on hamsters suggests steroid use produces greater long-term behavioral problems in males when the drugs are administered during adolescence.

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The Rise of the Nuisance Flood

Minor floods are afflicting parts of Maryland nearly 10 times more often than was the case in the 1960s.

America’s Streams Are Awash With Pesticides Banned in Europe

You may have never heard of clothianidin, but it's probably in your local river.

How Textbooks Have Changed the Face of War

War is more personal, less glorious, and more hellish in modern textbooks than in the past. But there’s still room for improvement.

NASA Could Build Entire Spacecrafts in Space Using 3-D Printers

This year NASA will experiment with 3-D printing small objects in space. That could mark the beginning of a gravity-free manufacturing revolution.

The Most Popular Ways to Share Good and Bad Personal News

Researchers rank the popularity of all of the different methods we have for telling people about our lives, from Facebook to face-to-face.

The Big One

One in two full-time American fast-food workers' families are enrolled in public assistance programs, at a cost of $7 billion per year. July/August 2014

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