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Study: Yep, Texting While Crossing the Street Is Not Great

• December 13, 2012 • 9:15 AM

Via the Seattle Times:

A study of more than 1,100 Seattle pedestrians in the optimistically titled journal Injury Prevention found that about a third are focusing on their phones or music players when crossing the street. Meaning not looking both ways first, but just at their own palm.

The study involved researchers sitting on 20 intersections and watching people cross the street, and recording whether they paid more attention to traffic or their devices. Apparently people spend two seconds more at an intersection when texting, which isn’t so bad. But they also were 400 percent more likely to miss looking at stoplights, stay in crosswalks or check the traffic.

Terrible, but we all know how this is going to end: someone will make an app.

Marc Herman
Marc Herman is a writer in Barcelona. He is the author of The Shores of Tripoli.

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