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Nail Polish, Democracy

• February 01, 2013 • 8:18 AM

Wafa Ben Hassine, writing today at Nawaat:

The social climate in Tunisia is deteriorating. Many people cannot even find a place to call home, a shelter. Many cannot afford to go to school. Many of the country’s youth remain unemployed (in fact the unemployment rate, according to several sources, has risen in the past year). The cost of living has gone up. For a few weeks, outrage was felt all over the country as many families could not even find a place to buy milk – since now, because of the lack of rule of law, many mafias and trade rings control the flow of certain nutritional products. These mostly economic troubles find their way into the Tunisian’s everyday psychology. People don’t smile at each other in the streetsimages-4 anymore. There is something that is called hiq’d [حقد] between people’s hearts. Hiq’d is a hidden enemity of sorts, an avarice. It’s the thought of hidden malice that looks for every opportunity to exact revenge on someone. Encountering such elemental challenges on a daily basis – not having enough food for the family, not feeling secure enough to go out at night, not trusting people – does this to our hearts. Hearts become hardened, and of course, many turn to more fundamentalist interpretations of Islam to cure this hardening of the heart. For a long time, this is what happened under Ben Ali’s rule. People could not breathe – economically, morally, politically – and so the popularity of satellite TV channels promulgated, including those channels that advocated for rather unsound spiritual practices and priorities. I remember watching a 90-mins long show on how evil and horrid nail polish is. Nail polish, people.

Hassine’s dispatch on the quotidian complexities of democratic transition continues here. A political science graduate of the University of California, San Diego, she is currently a student of international legal studies at the University of Denver.

Marc Herman
Marc Herman is a writer in Barcelona. He is the author of The Shores of Tripoli.

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