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My Vote for Most Inventive Way To Manage Stress

• January 17, 2013 • 10:38 AM

In the multi-tasking world we live in, it’s safe to say many of us are looking for either more hours, or better ways to manage our stress and workload.

In the multi-tasking world we live in, it’s safe to say many of us are looking for either more hours, or better ways to manage our stress and workload. So I thank NPR for making me laugh, with this story, on my (rushed) drive to work.

What began as a company’s suspicion that its infrastructure was being hacked turned into a case of a worker outsourcing his own job to a Chinese consulting firm, according to reports that cite an investigation by Verizon’s security team. The man was earning a six-figure salary.

Alas, the man has likely traded his work stress for a new kind of stress: unemployment.

Someone should let Peter Whybrow know of this new creative solution. Director of UCLA’s  Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Whybrow has been studying America’s over-stimulated mania for many years. Mary A. Fischer’s story on Whybrow notes:

“The idea is not that you don’t work hard,” Whybrow explains. “You do. But you have to be able to switch it off and create space. I’ve made a conscious decision to live a life that is not driven by someone else’s priority.” No matter how good that dopamine feels.

Maria Streshinsky
Maria Streshinsky is the editor of Pacific Standard, and was formerly the managing editor of The Atlantic in Washington, D.C. She spent two years working at the U.S. Department of the Interior.

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