Menus Subscribe Search

Follow us


(PHOTO COLLAGE: SHUTTERSTOCK)

Mindfulness Training Boosts Test Scores

• March 27, 2013 • 12:10 PM

(PHOTO COLLAGE: SHUTTERSTOCK)

New research finds a mere two weeks of mindfulness training leads to improved scores in tests of reading comprehension and working memory.

Studies reporting the benefits of mindfulness training keep rolling in—not quite with the regularity of those distracting thoughts that keep popping up in your head, but at a good clip nonetheless.

The latest, from a team at the University of California, Santa Barbara, reports even a short, two-week course in focusing the mind can lead to immediate, tangible results: higher scores on tests measuring reasoning and comprehension.

“Our results suggest that cultivating mindfulness is an effective and efficient technique for improving cognitive function, with wide-reaching consequences,” a research team led by psychologist Michael Mrazek writes in the journal Psychological Science.

The researchers describe a study featuring 48 undergraduates (14 male, 34 female). They were randomly chosen to spend two weeks in a four-day-per-week class on cultivating mindfulness, or an alternative course focusing on good nutrition.

Among other things, the mindfulness students took part in regular exercises that involved “focused attention to some aspect of sensory experience,” such as eating a piece of fruit.

They were also trained in the art of ignoring or dismissing thoughts of past experiences or future concerns by continually refocusing on the present moment. To reinforce this training, they were assigned to meditate for 10 minutes daily outside of class.

At the beginning and conclusion of the study, all the participants took two tests. One was a modified version of the verbal-reasoning section of the GRE, a standard test for application into graduate school. Mrazek and his colleagues describe it as “an assessment of reading comprehension.”

The second measured working memory capacity, the all-important ability to hold information in your mind while you process and apply it. Participants were asked to remember clusters of three to seven letters while performing an unrelated task.

The results: the nutrition instruction “did not cause changes in performance or mind-wandering,” the researchers write. In contrast, the mindfulness training led to “significant improvements in performance” on both tests.

Specifically, “the change in GRE accuracy from mindfulness training led to an average improvement analogous to 16 percentile points,” Mrazek and colleagues write.

Ommmmmazing!

The researchers tie these improvements directly to a better ability to focus on the questions at hand, especially among those students “who had been prone to mind wandering.” Using several methods, they determined those who had taken the mindfulness training were better able to maintain their attention on the material.

“This is the most complete and rigorous demonstration that mindfulness can reduce mind-wandering, one of the clearest demonstrations that mindfulness can improve working memory and reading, and the first study to tie all this together to show that mind-wandering mediates the improvements in performance,” Mrazek said, according to a UCSB media release.

As we reported a few days ago, one way to improve test scores is to believe you already have the answers. If tricking yourself in that way proves problematic, this study points to a different, and potentially quite effective, method.

If you’re spending 10 hours a day studying for that law- or medical-school exam, it’d be wise to carve out 10 minutes to meditate.

Tom Jacobs
Staff writer Tom Jacobs is a veteran journalist with more than 20 years experience at daily newspapers. He has served as a staff writer for The Los Angeles Daily News and the Santa Barbara News-Press. His work has also appeared in The Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, and Ventura County Star.

More From Tom Jacobs

Tags: , , ,

If you would like to comment on this post, or anything else on Pacific Standard, visit our Facebook or Google+ page, or send us a message on Twitter. You can also follow our regular updates and other stories on both LinkedIn and Tumblr.

A weekly roundup of the best of Pacific Standard and PSmag.com, delivered straight to your inbox.

Follow us


Subscribe Now

Quick Studies

What Makes You Neurotic?

A new study gets to the root of our anxieties.

Fecal Donor Banks Are Possible and Could Save Lives

Defrosted fecal matter can be gross to talk about, but the benefits are too remarkable to tiptoe around.

How Junk Food Companies Manipulate Your Tongue

We mistakenly think that harder foods contain fewer calories, and those mistakes can affect our belt sizes.

What Steve Jobs’ Death Teaches Us About Public Health

Studies have shown that when public figures die from disease, the public takes notice. New research suggests this could be the key to reaching those who are most at risk.

Speed-Reading Apps Will Not Revolutionize Anything, Except Your Understanding

The one-word-at-a-time presentation eliminates the eye movements that help you comprehend what you're reading.

The Big One

One state—Pennsylvania—logs 52 percent of all sales, shipments, and receipts for the chocolate manufacturing industry. March/April 2014