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Wendee Holtcamp

Wendee Holtcamp
Wendee Holtcamp is a Houston-based writer whose work has appeared in Scientific American, Smithsonian, National Wildlife, Audubon, Sierra and Nature. She also writes regularly about Texas water, wildlife and environmental issues for Texas Parks & Wildlife Magazine and has master's degrees in wildlife ecology and evolutionary biology from Texas A&M University and Rice University, respectively.

Recent posts

 

Nuclear Renaissance in Space

As the U.S. prepares to relaunch domestic production of plutonium-238, the space community wishes to assure the public of its safety. Are they right?

 

Was Lou Gehrig’s ALS Caused by Tap Water?

A toxic molecule found in pond scum may trigger neurodegenerative diseases such as ALS and Parkinson’s. Could a group of scientists, led by a botanist, hold the key to a cure?

 

Texas’ Thirst for Dams Bucks National Trend

North Texas, the fastest-growing region in the fastest-growing state in the nation, has a growing demand for water. While the rest of the U.S. is tearing down decaying dams, Texas wants some dam water.

 

Save the Birds — With Doppler Radar

Doppler radar helped save the Texas forests where millions of migrating birds rest each spring.

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Trust Is Waning, and Inequality May Be To Blame

Trust in others and confidence in institutions is declining, while economic inequality creeps up, a new study shows.

Dopamine Might Be Behind Impulsive Behavior

A monkey study suggests the brain chemical makes what's new and different more attractive.

School Counselors Do More Than You’d Think

Adding just one counselor to a school has an enormous impact on discipline and test scores, according to a new study.

How a Second Language Trains Your Brain for Math

Second languages strengthen the brain's executive control circuits, with benefits beyond words.

Would You Rather Go Blind or Lose Your Mind?

Americans consistently fear blindness, but how they compare it to other ailments varies across racial lines.

The Big One

One company, Amazon, controls 67 percent of the e-book market in the United States—down from 90 percent five years ago. September/October 2014 new-big-one-5

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