Menus Subscribe Search

Follow us


Seth Masket

Seth Masket
Seth Masket is a political scientist at the University of Denver, specializing in political parties, state legislatures, campaigns and elections, and social networks. He is the author of No Middle Ground: How Informal Party Organizations Control Nominations and Polarize Legislatures (University of Michigan Press, 2009). Follow him on Twitter @smotus.

Recent articles

Why Do Scandals Destroy Some Politicians but Not Others?

We’ve seen some careers ended, and others accelerated. What does the research have to say about who is ruined by a scandal and who isn’t?

watergate-complex

Why Make Stuff Up? The Incredible Demand on Campaign Reporters to Keep Things Interesting

Will the recent incorporation of some working political scientists into legacy media outlets help curb the use of misleading headlines and made-up stories of momentum in campaign coverage?

campaign-coverage

Could We Moderate Our Politics With Instant Runoffs?

An alternate voting system being tested in several cities around the world could have some surprising long-term effects.

ballot-voting

It’s OK to Pressure Ginsburg and Breyer to Retire From the Supreme Court

Retirement is just one more public action by a working politician for which an active constituency should have a say.

supreme-court-building-exterior

The Business of Higher Education: What We Miss by Looking Only at Balance Sheets

The generation of knowledge by professors. The transformative conversations that happen outside of the classroom. The advancements in our understanding of society. How can you put a value on any of these things?

harvard-yard

Common Core: The Obamacare of Education Policy

The education standards now adopted by 45 states are nothing like the Affordable Care Act, but have a lot in common with “Obamacare,” that cartoon created by the conservative media to convince viewers of Obama’s socialist agenda.

empty-classroom-core

Understanding a Politician’s Motives: Why Did Jan Brewer Veto SB 1062 in Arizona?

A politician’s true ideological position, however unknowable that may be for an outsider, is an important consideration when attempting to determine motive. But it’s not the only consideration.

arizona-capitol

How Realistic Is ‘House of Cards’ Anyway?

Not at all, really. But that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t enjoy it for what it is.

cards

How to Implement a Policy You Hate: Lessons From the Legalization of Marijuana

In Colorado, voters very clearly articulated a position, and the government was compelled to follow through with it—like it or not. Is this an example of democracy at its best?

colorado-denver-capitol

Wait, Did California Fix Political Polarization?

Other states are moving quickly to adopt reforms passed by California voters in 2010, but there may be unintended consequences.

cali-capitol

A weekly roundup of the best of Pacific Standard and PSmag.com, delivered straight to your inbox.

Follow us


Subscribe Now

Quick Studies

When a Romance Is Threatened, People Rebound With God

And when they feel God might reject them, they buddy up to their partner.

How Can We Protect Open Ocean That Does Not Yet Exist?

As global warming melts ice and ushers in a wave of commercial activity in the Arctic, scientists are thinking about how to protect environments of the future.

What Kind of Beat Makes You Want to Groove?

The science behind the rhythms that get you on the dance floor.

Pollution’s Racial Divides

When it comes to the injustice of air pollution, the divide between blacks and whites is greater than the gap between the rich and the poor.

Hunger and Low Blood Sugar Can Spur Domestic Quarrels

In an experiment, scientists found a correlation between low blood glucose and higher levels of spousal frustration.

The Big One

One state—Pennsylvania—logs 52 percent of all sales, shipments, and receipts for the chocolate manufacturing industry. March/April 2014