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Dennis Rosen

Dennis Rosen
Dennis Rosen is a pediatric pulmonologist practicing in Boston, and the author of Vital Conversations: Improving Communication Between Doctors and Patients.

Recent posts

Health Care

doctor-patient-relationship

Right Side Down: Why Doctors Need to Respect Patients’ Cultural Beliefs

A recent interaction with a Muslim family reminded Dennis Rosen just how critical it is that he incorporates cultural and religious beliefs into treatment plans whenever possible.

Health Care

empty-nurse-station-hospital

The Potent Effect Your Doctor’s Words Can Have on Your Well-Being

Placebos, nocebos, and the importance of communicating with our physicians.

Health Care

empty-hospital-room

Undermining the Doctor-Patient Relationship

To provide the best level of care, physicians need to spend as much time as they can with their patients. So why are we asking them to put so much effort into keeping electronic records?

 

mercy-ship

After Typhoon Haiyan, Ask Yourself, ‘Why Not Volunteer?’

The benefits of volunteering to help strangers in distress in faraway places accrue both to the victims—and to the helpers.

 

health-care-costs

Why Health Care Inflation May Lead to Cheaper Health Care

There’s a possible silver lining in the almost unchecked and seemingly unstoppable rise in the cost of U.S. health care, and it will be apparent once you start paying for more of your day-to-day needs.

 

xrays

Should Patients Determine How Much Hospitals Get Paid?

Op-ed: Talking openly with patients is necessary to improve medicine, but what happens when a tough conversation gets factored into payment?

 

Book Review: Helping, or Harming, in Haiti?

A new book analyzes the successes and failures of the Haitian earthquake relief effort and offers some lessons for future well-meaning humanitarian interventions.

 

Changing Parental Attitudes on Child Vaccinations

Pediatrics specialist Dennis Rosen says rebuilding trust between patients and health providers can change parental attitudes regarding child vaccinations and save young lives.

 

Review: Seeing Haiti’s Distress as People, Not Statistics

The new book “A Promise in Haiti” focuses on three families and puts meat on the bones of a nation most of the world sees as just a carcass.

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Sufferers of Social Anxiety Disorder, Your Friends Like You

The first study of friends' perceptions suggest they know something's off with their pals but like them just the same.

Standing Up for My Group by Kicking Yours

Members of a minority ethnic group are less likely to express support for gay equality if they believe their own group suffers from discrimination.

How Old Brains Learn New Tricks

A new study shows that the neural plasticity needed for learning doesn't vanish as we age—it just moves.

Ethnic Diversity Deflates Market Bubbles

But it's not in the rainbow and sing-along way you'd hope for. We just don't trust outsiders' judgments.

Online Brain Exercises Are Probably Useless

Even under the guidance of a specialist trainer, computer-based brain exercises have only modest benefits, a new analysis shows.

The Big One

One company, Comcast, will control up to 40 percent of Internet service coverage in the U.S., and 19 of the top 20 cable markets, if a proposed merger with Time Warner Cable is approved by regulators. November/December 2014

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