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Avital Andrews

Avital Andrews
Avital Andrews writes about thought leaders, environmental issues, food, and travel. She also reports for Sierra, the Los Angeles Times, and the Huffington Post. Follow her on Twitter at @avitalb.

Recent posts

Quick Studies

breastfeeding

Breastfeeding Is the Best Feeding, but U.S. Mothers Are Too Overworked to Provide It

The problem: Most American mothers don’t meet their breastfeeding goals. The solution: Well, there are many.

Quick Studies

marriage

When Men Who Abstain From Premarital Sex Get Married

Young men who take abstinence pledges have trouble adjusting to sexual norms when they become husbands.

Quick Studies

trust

Your Brain Decides Whether to Trust Someone in Milliseconds

We can determine trustworthiness even when we’re only subliminally aware of the other person.

Quick Studies

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Young, Undocumented, and Invisible

While young migrant workers struggle under poor working conditions, U.S. policy has done little to help.

Quick Studies

syrian refugees

Education, Interrupted

When it comes to educational access, young Syrian refugees are becoming a “lost generation.”

Quick Studies

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Being a Couch Potato: Not So Bad After All?

For those who feel guilty about watching TV, a new study provides redemption.

Quick Studies

c-sect

Cesareans Are Still Best for Feet-First Babies

A new study confirms that surgery is the safest way to deliver a breech fetus.

Quick Studies

sleeping

The Impossibility of the Night Shift

Many night workers get “shift-work sleep disorder.” And no one knows how to treat it.

Quick Studies

baby

When Mothers Sing, Premature Babies Thrive

Moms willing to serenade pre-term infants help their babies—and themselves.

Quick Studies

brain

Psychopathic or Just Antisocial? A Key Brain Difference Tells the Tale

Though psychopaths and antisocial people may seem similar, what occurs in their brains isn’t.

Quick Studies

library

Common Knowledge Makes Us More Cooperative

People are more inclined to take mutually beneficial risks if they know what others know.

Quick Studies

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How a Shift in Human Head Shape Changed Everything

When did homo sapiens become a more sophisticated species? Not until our skulls underwent “feminization.”

Quick Studies

journalist at desk crop 2

Journalists Can Get PTSD Without Leaving Their Desks

Dealing with violent content takes a heavy toll on some reporters.

Quick Studies

sheeple

Facebook App Shoppers Do What Their Friends Do

People on Facebook are more influenced by their immediate community than by popular opinion.

Quick Studies

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Your Fitbit Might Be Ripping You Off

Without more specific analysis, personal health tools tend to leave the “burden of synthesis on the self-tracker.”

Quick Studies

veggies

‘Eat Your Vegetables’ Is Easier for Low-Income Mothers Who Get Help

Recent research suggests that if we pay economically disadvantaged women to buy more produce, many will.

Quick Studies

eyes

The Eyes Are the Window to Your Potential Soul Mate

Want to know whether he—or she—is into you? Watch their eyes.

Quick Studies

genocide

The Demographics of Genocide: Who Commits Mass Murder?

New research reveals that perpetrators of the genocide in Rwanda were most likely to be males in their mid-thirties.

Quick Studies

brain.jpg

Brain Wiring Affects Whether You Do—or Don’t—Get PTSD

The little amygdala plays a bigger role in traumatic disorders than previously thought.

Quick Studies

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Working-Class Politicians Aren’t Always Best for the Working Class

Voters think lawmakers from humble beginnings are more likely to stick up for the little guy. They’re not.

Quick Studies

parenting.jpg

Warmer Parenting Makes Antisocial Toddlers More Empathetic

Loving care may be the best antidote to callous behavior in young children.

The 30 Top Thinkers Under 30

johnson-hall-uo

The 30 Top Thinkers Under 30: The Policy Advocate for Households Who Wants to Redesign Social Programs

For the month of April we’re profiling the individuals who made our inaugural list of the 30 top thinkers under 30, the young men and women we predict will have a serious impact on the social, political, and economic issues we cover every day here at Pacific Standard.

The 30 Top Thinkers Under 30

american-education

The 30 Top Thinkers Under 30: The Aspiring Princess Who Wants to See Major Changes in America’s Education System

For the month of April we’re profiling the individuals who made our inaugural list of the 30 top thinkers under 30, the young men and women we predict will have a serious impact on the social, political, and economic issues we cover every day here at Pacific Standard.

The 30 Top Thinkers Under 30

state-department

The 30 Top Thinkers Under 30: The First-Generation American Who Wants to Improve Asian-American Relations

For the month of April we’re profiling the individuals who made our inaugural list of the 30 top thinkers under 30, the young men and women we predict will have a serious impact on the social, political, and economic issues we cover every day here at Pacific Standard.

The 30 Top Thinkers Under 30

bobst

The 30 Top Thinkers Under 30: The Sir Henry Wellcome Fellow Who Wants to Better Understand Psychiatric Disorders

For the month of April we’re profiling the individuals who made our inaugural list of the 30 top thinkers under 30, the young men and women we predict will have a serious impact on the social, political, and economic issues we cover every day here at Pacific Standard.

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Love and Hate in Israel and Palestine

Psychologists find that parties to a conflict think they're motivated by love while their enemies are motivated by hate.

How to Water a Farm in Sandy Ground

Physicists investigate how to grow food more efficiently in fine-grained soil.

Unlocking Consciousness

A study of vegetative patients closes in on the nature of consciousness.

Advice for Emergency Alert Systems: Don’t Cry Wolf

A survey finds college students don't always take alerts seriously.

Brain’s Reward Center Does More Than Manage Rewards

Nucleus accumbens tracks many different connections in the world, a new rat study suggests.

The Big One

One company, Amazon, controls 67 percent of the e-book market in the United States—down from 90 percent five years ago. September/October 2014 new-big-one-5

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